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Eagles – Desperado (Album Review)

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Eagles – Desperado (Album Review)

A year after their astonishingly good Self-Titled debut, the Eagles returned with Desperado; an album arguably leaning more towards a country-styling, than their debut, as they focused on the old west in American culture. Considering Desperado as a concept album, one can't help but see a correlation between Desperado and Elton John's similarly themed 1970 released Tumbleweed Connection. Perhaps the Eagles copied that concept, but if that was ever an element, it has never been discussed to my knowledge. Either way, as a fan of the old west, when the theme is done well, as it is in this case, it can be extraordinarily rewarding for the listener.

As a life-long fan of the Eagles, Desperado was always going to be a must-own release for my collection and the copy I am fortunate enough to own is the 2014 vinyl reissue. Sonically, it is a beautiful reproduction that is dynamically pleasing with an incredible soundstage that is as wide as it is deep. I love it when the speakers disappear, and I become immersed in the musicPart of the immersion can also be attributed to the album artwork that is striking in its presentation and this particular reissue has a textual cover, reportedly the same as the original 1973 vinyl release. At least it isn’t a fingerprint magnet like those albums released by Music On Vinyl (MOV); they look stunning and are very well pressed, but over time the fingerprints weaken the artwork. While the red text, on the near-black background looks a little washed out and therefore more difficult to read, it is a major improvement over the Self-Titled debut whereby the text was basically unreadable. 

While the re-issue was marketed as replicating the original artwork, the album label is different to the original releases I’ve seen whereby they had the plain white background, this edition has the clouds background. It isn’t really an issue, but I do appreciate authenticity. It would have been incredible for the record label to match the texture of the record sleeve but I'm not even sure if that can be technically achieved, as the labels are applied during the heat/moulding stage, but it is nevertheless cool to think about. 

The record itself comes in a lovely static free inner sleeve, black in colour with a clear centre. While the music itself is paramount, both sides of the album are mastered and pressed perfectly. This is certainly a re-issue that I would recommend to any fan of the Eagles.  

SIDE ONE

Doolin-Dalton is incredibly compelling. That harmonica just reaches into my soul every time I listen to this masterpiece. It’s also important to note that it is less harsh on the vinyl version when compared directly to any of the digital counterparts.

Twenty-One is too ‘country’ for my liking. The banjo is an acquired taste and while I don't dislike it, I feel it is played too fast for this song and subsequently it’s as though I’m listening to two different songs when Twenty-One starts playing.

Out Of Control is a solid rock song that I feel would have sounded better on On The Border, just as James Dean does. If you didn't know, James Dean was recorded for Desperado but held back at the time as it didn’t match the album perfectly.

Tequila Sunrise, as I've said before, is a beautifully relaxing song that gets better the more often I hear it. I don't know as I could ever tire of this song as it uses every part of the soundstage to ensure you're enveloped in sound. Amazing!

Desperado, having not been released as a single, has become a fan favourite and is one of the Eagle's very best recordings. Vocally it is a little rough around the edges, but that gives the song character and I couldn't imagine it with any more spit and polish.

SIDE TWO

Certain Kind Of Fool is fantastic. The perfect guitar strum. The perfect tempo. The perfect vocal delivery. Certain Kind Of Fool is a hidden gem that casual fans would likely miss but is undoubtedly one of the best songs on the album.

Doolin’ Dalton (Instrumental) is a distraction and while it flows well into Outlaw Man, Desperado would have been fine without this deviation. Interestingly, this instrumental track has never been listed on the back of the record sleeve. It is written on the record label, however. Other than a typo that has remained consistent throughout the years, I can’t help but wonder why this may be the case.

Outlaw Man is a killer song with a spectacular soundstage and while positioned on the B-side of the album, it’s an A-side in my opinion. I love it! On a side note, this song would have been perfectly suited to Fleetwood MacRumours era.

Saturday Night is a lovely ballad. Perfect harmonics and just an all-around great song. As good as some of the tracks on Side One are, it is really the second side that makes Desperado a must-own album. Astonishingly good!

Bitter Creek is one of my all-time favourite Eagles songs. You may not have heard it before as it is unlikely to be played live and doesn’t appear on any of the Eagles’ career perspective releases, but there is something very special here. The simplicity of that guitar strum and intermingling vocal, interspersed with the harmonies, is nothing short of amazing.

Doolin-Dalton (Reprise) is enjoyable but I would have been extremely happy if Bitter Creek was the final song on the album. I’ve never been much of a fan of the reprise, as I would generally prefer to hear the original track again, however, I do enjoy the electric guitar tracking instead of the harmonica as it creates a unique experience that works remarkably well.

Similarly, Desperado (Reprise) builds upon the original song without disrupting the magic that made the original so special. It’s a perfect way to close the album, ensuring I’ll listen again and stay within the Eagles’ catalogue.

Desperado is an album of hidden gems, combined with a few hits and a couple of misses. However, it all comes together in a coherent album that is thoroughly enjoyable and worthy of the Eagles.

Desperado is available on Vinyl, CD, the TIDAL Store (16/44.1kHz FLAC), and iTunes (Mastered for iTunes).

If you prefer streaming, Desperado is available on TIDAL Hi-Fi and Apple Music.

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Eagles – Self-Titled (Album Review)

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Eagles – Self-Titled (Album Review)

Some of the most interesting albums are debuts as they can either make or break an artist. Regardless of the outcome, it’s always interesting to see how the artist evolves over time, especially from a retrospective viewpoint. That said, I don’t believe I’d be wrong in suggesting that the Eagles had already found their sound on this Self-Titled debut and went about refining their talent on each subsequent album.

Album covers in the 70s were probably as unique as they have ever been, with artists and record labels seeing what would work and what wouldn’t on the large vinyl canvas. The Eagles’ debut is no exception as the cover would not only encompass the bands country meets rock musical style perfectly but would fold out to a larger poster that one could hang or admire while listening to the album. Over the years, the Eagles’ Self-Titled release has been reissued numerously and the edition I’m fortunate enough to own is the 2015 vinyl re-issue with the original album artwork. Yes, it looks impressive, but as the record doesn’t sit in a dedicated enclosure, one has to be careful not to pick the record up, out of its outer sleeve, and watch as the record slips from one’s hand across the room. Okay, so perhaps that’s an exaggeration, but if you’re new to vinyl, these unique designs can be a challenge when dealing with the larger format. 

The inner sleeve is plain and somewhat lacklustre if I’m to be honest. The red text on the natural background is incredibly difficult to read and subsequently wasn't really well thought out in my opinion. The label itself is plain but elegant. Yes, even though I use the Audio Technica AT-618 LP Stabilizer, I love looking at the record labels. I even lust over compact discs and in a bygone era, it wasn’t uncommon for me to appreciate the designs of the compact cassette. I'm not sure why it’s such a fascination, but I find it a thoroughly enjoyable part of the record collecting process.

Of course, as impressive as the record looks, it would be for nought if the audio quality wasn't up to par. Well, I think we can all agree as to just how sonically stunning the Eagles are, and this debut is no exception. The record is as black as the ace of spades, perfectly flat, and has no noticeable inner groove distortion or surface noise. While purists may lament that a significant majority of reissues are being sourced from high-resolution digital files, rather than the original master tapes, the pressing of this 2015 reissue is flawless with a full analogue sound that simply has to be heard to be believed. I have compared both the TIDAL Masters (MQA) and Apple Music (Mastered for iTunes) editions against the record and you won’t see me part with this vinyl record anytime soon. Yes, it is that good and for fans of the band, I highly recommend this particular reissue.

SIDE ONE

Take It Easy, as I've mentioned before, is perfect for a country drive. When I hear this Eagles standard, I can only imagine the excitement of fans when they put the record on for the first time in 1972. It must have blown their minds for it still astonishes me to this day as to how developed the musicality of the Eagles is on this debut. In many respects, it's good that Jackson Browne was unable to finish the song and required Glenn Frey’s involvement. I simply couldn’t imagine the Eagles debut without Take It Easy. Jackson Browne did, however, record a rendition for his 1973 album, For Everyman, and while it’s a lovely interpretation, that doesn’t stray far from the Eagles’ original, Browne’s interpretation failed to set the world on fire as the Eagles’ version did.

Witchy Woman is a killer track that really showcases just how well the vocal harmonies of the Eagles members flow together. Witchy Women is, in many respects, the perfect classic rock song that encompasses many musical eras and styles. Seriously, I could be here all day just listing them, but let’s just enjoy listening to this absolutely amazing tune, shall we?

Chug All Night is a slow starter but develops into a solid song that is thoroughly enjoyable. While it may not be a fan favourite, the album wouldn’t be the same without the frantic beat and low volume harmonies that are off-the-chart. A great rock song!

Most Of Us Are Sad is sensational! The drum and bass track blow my mind, as does the guitar strumming and vocal harmonies. Music doesn't get much better than this.

Nightingale was almost not included on the album as producer Glyn Johns felt it was substandard. One could hardly argue with him as it is filler, a B-side at best, but the record label, in this case, won and it’s of course included. In reality, it isn’t fundamentally a bad song, it just isn't to the same calibre as the other songs on the album. 

SIDE TWO

Train Leaves Here This Morning is a lovely country-focused tune that has a beautiful soundstage and depth that envelops you in sound.

Take The Devil is one of the best songs on the album, and in the Eagles catalogue, that very few know about as it doesn't make an appearance in live performances or on career perspective releases. The rhythm is seriously addictive, and the musicality of the entire recording is uncompromising. 

Earlybird has a fun little entrance, but it can be equally infuriating if you're not in the mood for those chirpy bird sounds throughout. Nevertheless, while it may be a B-side, it's a solid song that fits well with the style of the album.

Peaceful Easy Feeling is a lovely song, but as I've said before, the guitar twang mid-song is a little too high pitched for my liking and I subsequently find it distracting. A shame considering it is an otherwise exceptional song with yet another beautiful vocal presentation. 

Tryin' is a solid song to close the album with. Nothing to write home about, but a perfect B-side if there ever was one. Tryin' certainly makes me want to listen to the album again and stay within the Eagles’ extensive catalogue.

The debut Self-Titled Eagles album is astonishingly good from start to finish and shows a band with a sound signature that would take others years to develop. It really is one of their greatest albums and even if you're a casual fan, you'll find something to love on this Self-Titled debut.

Eagles – Self-Titled is available on Vinyl, CD, the TIDAL Store (16/44.1kHz FLAC), and iTunes (Mastered for iTunes).

If you prefer streaming, Eagles – Self-Titled is available on TIDAL Hi-Fi and Apple Music.

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John Fogerty – Deja Vu All Over Again (Album Review)

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John Fogerty – Deja Vu All Over Again (Album Review)

It can be difficult to think of John Fogerty as a solo artist, for his songwriting, singing, and overall musicality has permanently been linked to Creedence Clearwater Revival (CCR). However, if you think he did his best work in CCR, you'd be mistaken as Fogerty is nothing short of a living legend. While the solo albums may not sell as well as the CCR back catalogue, Deja Vu All Over Again is impeccably recorded and mastered, showing just how good the red book CD format can sound.

With a short runtime of just over half an hour, there isn't a single B-side to be found. I've said it before, and I'll say it again, I love shorter runtimes as artists tend to focus on perfection, rather than filling the available capacity of the format.

It also helps to have a stellar band, including the prolific and exceptional drummer Kenny Aronoff. Mark Knopfler also makes a sonically spectacular appearance on Nobody's Here Anymore; Dire Straits fans will be thoroughly pleased, I know I am!

Fogerty himself arranged and produced the album and as you listen, you can hear the love and devotion that he placed into the entire album. Although, that could be said for all his records dating back to Bayou County in 1969 with CCR. Let's just say the magic of John Fogerty is not often matched.

This review is based on listening to the 2004 Geffen CD release: Cat: 9863468. Deja Vu All Over Again has only ever been released on CD, but that shouldn't be seen as a negative viewpoint as I can't imagine this recording sounding any better on vinyl or high-res digital, it is really that good!

Deja Vu (All Over Again) is the perfect song to commence the album with. The musicality will envelop you as Fogerty's vocal is so clear you feel he is in the room with you. Pure perfection!

Sugar-Sugar (In My Life) has an upbeat sound that reminds me of Hanson's MMMBop. Yes, dear reader, I’m starting to think I listen to too much music. Nevertheless, I love these odd connections. They are often comical and circumstantial, but can also, at times, reveal musical influences.

She's Got Baggage is your classic rock and roll song. It's fun and if your body isn't already moving, it will be by the end of this song. Although, it is borderline campy, but manages to stay clear of being too campy.

Radar sounds like the 60s was reimagined for a modern era. I love it!

Honey Do slows the album to a country-style, but the shift is perfect and not jarring to the listener. I don't know about you, but I always find myself singing along to this spectacular rockabilly song.

Nobody's Here Anymore is sonic gold. Not only is it the best song on the album, but it is up there as one of the best songs Fogerty has ever written and recorded. Lyrically, even though written in 2004, the other dimension Fogerty sings about is still relevant to our modern society. Yes, Knopfler's beautiful guitar work is the icing on the cake!

I Will Walk With You is a beautiful song, highlighting the rhythm of the bass guitar. It works so well and perfectly suits the album.

Rhubarb Pie is a fun little song with a killer slide guitar performance throughout.

Wicked Old Witch is blues/country rock 101. However, while I love this song, I find the introduction to be a mixed bag. I would have much preferred the song to commence with the bass drum beat, rather than the Banjo. That said, I do appreciate the intent, but I feel as though the Banjo is simply too distant and concealed in the soundstage, therefore making it a less than desirable addition.

In The Garden has an incredible drum track that is beautifully mixed with all other musical elements. In The Garden is the perfect way to close the album and it compels me to listen to this short, but perfect, album again.

Deja Vu All Over Again is superb from start to finish and reminds me that despite my admiration for CCR, I do find Fogerty's solo works to be more appealing and addictive. Either way, there can never be too much CCR or John Fogerty.

Deja Vu All Over Again is available on Vinyl, CD, the TIDAL Store (16/44.1 kHz FLAC), and iTunes.

If you prefer streaming, Deja Vu All Over Again is also available on Spotify and Apple Music.

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Elton John - Tumbleweed Connection (Album Review)

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Elton John - Tumbleweed Connection (Album Review)

You'd think that following the Pop/Rock success of John's self-titled album, Elton John, the last thing on his mind would have been a change of style. Well the country-infused concept album, Tumbleweed Connection, cemented the musical skill of not only John but Bernie Taupin. While it isn't Nashville Country Music, it is appealing to a broader demographic with its Roots, Blues, and Country Rock musicality. That said, Tumbleweed Connection is more the merging of the genres, rather than highlighting one in particular. It is unique, compelling, and is classic Elton John.

The artwork for this album is legendary, but you wouldn't know that looking at the basic artwork shown on all streaming services. As numerous albums from the vinyl era do, their cover continues to the rear, thereby creating a captivating landscape. While I don't yet have a physical copy of this album, the website Discogs is a wonderful place to explore all the editions and associated design choices.

While I have Tumbleweed Connection on my Discogs wish list, I aim to pick up the 2004 SACD edition, rather than the Vinyl release as it contains the surround sound mix by Greg Penny. These mixes are generally highly regarded and if my Blu-ray High Fidelity Pure Audio (HFPA) 5.I Surround Sound copy of Goodbye Yellow Brick Road is any indication, then I am in for an experience that has to be heard to be believed. By comparison, my Vinyl copy, and all other stereo editions of Goodbye Yellow Brick Road sound flat and lifeless by comparison. Yes, I acknowledge the mastering variations of a surround sound mix versus a stereo mix, but the difference is quite profound and more enjoyable. Regardless, when I pick up the SACD release, I'll post a review for those of you who may be interested. In the meantime, this review is based on the 1995 remaster available on TIDAL Hi-Fi. Overall, it is a very relaxed and enjoyable remaster that pre-dates the horrors of remastering for loudness alone.

Ballad Of A Well-Known Gun is now a staple in John's catalogue, but as catchy as it is, I just can't get into the tempo as it has always sounded a little too offbeat for my liking.

Come Down In Time is simply gorgeous. It is one of my favourite songs on the album and one of the best songs Elton John ever recorded.

County Comfort is an absolute classic that has been covered numerous times. Of the mainstream covers, I don't believe Rod Stewart did a great job of it on Gasoline Alley. Whereas, I thoroughly enjoy Keith Urban’s rendition on Be Here as I feel it pays homage to the original while being simultaneously modern and perfectly suited to Urban's style. That said, the original is, as most originals are, beyond reproach. John's version is so compelling that I could listen to it repeatedly without tiring of the song.

Son Of Your Father isn't great. Musically it’s interesting, but the lyrical delivery is disjointed until the chorus kicks in, then the song starts to become a little more compelling. Sadly, it isn't enough for me to be captivated and hence I put this song into the B-side category.

My Father's Gun is fantastic. That chorus is really appealing and the overall musically of the song is top notch in my opinion.

Where To Now St. Peter? is really enjoyable. Yet it is somewhat offbeat and shouldn't really work, but it does and systematically showcases the incredible understanding of music and its associated composition by John and Taupin.

Love Song works in well within the album construct. However, as a song on its own, I don't find it compelling. The background real-life sounds also detract from the music, although I am interested to see how these elements will be placed in the surround sound mix.

Amoreena is a B-side for me. It isn't bad, but it isn't a standout either.

Talking Old Soldiers is lovely in its simplicity. A simply amazing performance. Sonic perfection!

Burn Down The Mission is a solid B-side. Musically, there is much to like here, but I find the mix conceals the vocals a little too much.

Into The Old Man's Shoes is a great song that, once again, fits in perfectly with the album and overall style of the recording.

Madman Across The Water is epic! I never tire of this song and I really love this original version. It has such an immersive soundstage, you really need to turn the volume up on this one and be enveloped with sound. The re-recording on the similarly titled album, Madman Across The Water, is also compelling, but I find it to be overproduced and lacking some of the rawness that made this original so special.

Overall, Tumbleweed Connection is a masterful release that adds intrinsic value to Elton John's early era in the recording industry.

Tumbleweed Connection is available on Vinyl, SACD, CD, the TIDAL Store (16/44.1 kHz FLAC), and iTunes.

A Deluxe Edition is also available on CD, the TIDAL Store (16/44.1 kHz FLAC), and iTunes.

If you prefer streaming, Tumbleweed Connection is also available on Spotify (Standard / Deluxe Edition) and Apple Music (Standard / Deluxe Edition).

Click here to read other Elton John reviews by Subjective Sounds.

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Hank Williams Jr. – 127 Rose Avenue (Album Review)

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Hank Williams Jr. – 127 Rose Avenue (Album Review)

While he may not be the original, Hank Williams Jr. is one of the most talented and engaging country music performers on the planet.

127 Rose Avenue is a sonically gorgeous album and I was amazed to learn that Williams Jr. also took on the responsibility of the mastering process. Normally musicians record, occasionally mix, and leave the mastering to others. That, at times, results in questionable outcomes and I would much prefer that the musician master the performance, or at the very least be present for the mastering sessions thereby ensuring their fans are going to receive a facsimile as close to the original intent as possible. While we can talk ad nauseam about high-resolution, vinyl superiority, and file formats, none of this is relevant to 127 Rose Avenue as the original recording was mastered perfectly for the 16/44.1 kHz Redbook CD format. Seriously, the results are incredible and if you truly want to hear what the artist intended, then look no further than 127 Rose Avenue.

Farm Song has a great toe tapping beat and the guitar soloing is spot on. Fantastic!

Red, White & Pink Slip Blues is a gorgeous slow song that while inherently different to Farm Song, blends in perfectly. When it comes to Country Music tempo, I absolutely love this style of song as I could listen to it for hours. The soundstage is massive and I encourage you to pump the volume. It is one of the best songs on the album and one of my all-time favourite country music songs.

High Maintenance Woman has an incredible drum performance. This is how drums should sound. None of that synthetic rubbish we hear so often in modern recordings. Yes, drum machines have their place, but they can never replace a proper drum setup, driven by a skilled musician. Overall, the song is superb and will have your body moving like all great upbeat country music should.

Mighty Oak Tree slows the album down for another ballad-style track, but the tracking is done so well that there is no jolt to the senses. Mighty Oak Tree really shows off Jr.'s vocal chops and has me swaying with eyes closed as I am left mesmerised by sonic perfection. Every element is spot on and I adore the guitar and intermingling fiddle performance.

Forged By Fire has a massive soundstage. There are no crushed dynamics here! The chorus is addictive and that guitar work is once again glorious. The meaning behind the lyrics is also very touching.

Last Driftin' Cowboy has a classic country feel to it, but I'm not sure it works well as my mind struggles to connect emotionally with the song. That said, I can respect the intent of the song, but I would class it as a B-side.

127 Rose Avenue is sonic perfection. I love it!

All The Roads is a good song, but it isn't generally the style of country music that I appreciate. It is, however, recorded, mixed, and mastered beautifully. Perhaps my dislike for this style is the fact that it can often come across as jarring on the senses, thankfully that isn’t the case for All The Roads.

Sounds Like Justice returns the album to the county sound I appreciate most. The lyrics for this song are brilliant and while I generally appreciate music void of lyrical meaning, that is not the case when listening to 127 Rose Avenue.

Long Gone Lonesome Blues is a song that reminds me of Keith Richards’ Crosseyed Heart. Needless to say, I love this song.

Gulf Shore Road is a gorgeous song to close the album with. It is so good that upon each listen I am disappointed that the album has come to an end. For perhaps the first time ever, I really wanted the album to have a longer runtime. That said, I will take quality over quantity every time. As such, I find myself listening to 127 Rose Avenue on repeat for hours on end. It also encourages me to explore Hank Williams Jr.'s extensive catalogue.

For this review, I listened to the TIDAL Hi-Fi (16/44.1 kHz FLAC) edition of the album.

127 Rose Avenue is available for purchase on CD, the TIDAL Store (16/44.1 kHz FLAC), and iTunes. If you prefer streaming, you can also listen to the album on Spotify and Apple Music.

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Crosby, Stills & Nash - CSN (Album Review)

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Crosby, Stills & Nash - CSN (Album Review)

Most people would already know if they are a CSN (Crosby, Stills & Nash) fan, but for those of you who are not aware of the 70s rock band, specialising in folk while dabbling in country, then the album CSN is the perfect introduction to a band that demands respect from music fans the world over.

From a sonic perspective, think America, Genesis, and Neil Young. Yes, Young would join CSN throughout their career and those performances would be under the moniker, CSNY (Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young). Other sonic similarities include, but are certainly not limited to the Eagles and Bread. It is my opinion that if you enjoy these artists, you will love CSN.

The album cover really appeals to me for some reason. Perhaps it is the happiness expressed by the band members and the feeling that they are ordinary guys like you and I. Whatever it is, I class this cover as one of the most iconic for the era and I dare say it is the best cover art from their career.

While they may appear, on face value, to be three ordinary guys, the incredible soundstage and overall sonic presentation is anything but ordinary. Sit back, relax, and join me as we experience the sonic wonderland that is CSN.

Shadow Captain really highlights the musical style of CSN. I absolutely adore the rhythm and depth of the soundstage. The drum beat is exceptional and full of energy. The continuous hi-hat element is recorded beautifully as the sound tapers off gently into the next note. While it adds a little treble to the mix, it doesn’t detract from an otherwise smooth sound.

See The Changes has an exceptional vocal harmony. The acoustic musicality is a basic composition but is performed remarkably well. Sometimes less really is more and I couldn't imagine this song with more complex sonic elements. See The Changes is nothing short of pure perfection.

Carried Away is beautiful!

Fair Game has a Caribbean feel. It’s a good song but it isn't a favourite of mine.

Anything At All is a lovely song that will captivate you from the very first note. 

Cathedral immediately reminds me of Genesis. I don't know about you, but I love it when a song reminds me of another artist. It is like my mind has a built-in discovery algorithm. Anyway, getting back to the song, I absolutely adore Cathedral! From the slow beginning to the increased tempo mid song, it is absolutely perfect and one of the best songs CSN ever recorded.

Dark Star is a really enjoyable song, yet I find that I don't connect with it on an emotional level.

Just A Song Before I Go is another song that has a perfect match of vocal harmony and instrumentation. It is a gorgeous song that has been recorded, mixed, and mastered impeccably well.

Run From Tears has a killer guitar riff that, along with Stephen Stills' lead vocal, really takes a B-side and turns it into an A-side.

Cold Rain has a delightful piano introduction as it builds to yet another gorgeous vocal harmony. Cold Rain is sonically beautiful and an absolute pleasure to listen to. Your ears will thank you for listening to this track.

In My Dreams is textbook Easy Listening.

I Give You Give Blind has an introduction that I'm not fond of, but once the song begins I tend to enjoy it. As the final track, it encourages me to listen to the album again and stay within the CSN and CSNY catalogues. That said, there is part of me that would have liked to have seen Just A Song Before I Go as the final track. Yes, I know it would have been corny, but I also think it would have been perfect.

Overall, CSN is one of the greatest albums ever recorded. Even the couple of songs that I don’t connect with are worthy when listening to the entire album as a single body of work.

For this review, I listened to the TIDAL Master/MQA edition at 24/96 kHz. It is important to note that this was only the first software unfold, carried out by Audirvana Plus 3, as I’ve yet to invest in an MQA compatible DAC. Unfortunately, Oppo has yet to announce their intentions regarding support for MQA. If you have a DAC that is MQA compatible, you will be able to listen to CSN at the full 24/192 kHz resolution. That said, the 24/96 has a full-bodied sound with perfect mastering. Yes, I am aware that Steve Hoffman worked his mastering magic on CSN in 2013, however, I have not heard that edition and subsequently can not comment on the sonic qualities of that release. The MQA edition lists mastering, remastering, and digital mastering as being undertaken by Joe Gastwirt. Regardless, I can honestly say that if I were only able to listen to the MQA edition, I would consider it an absolute privilege to enjoy such a high-quality production. When compared to the 16/44.1 kHz CD-quality edition on TIDAL Hi-Fi, there is a noticeable difference and I find the CD-quality edition to be rather fatiguing as the dynamics and overall soundstage is simply not as smooth as that presented by MQA, despite being the work of the same mastering engineer. I know many of you have yet to test MQA, but I have consistently been blown away by the quality since TIDAL began streaming it in January 2017. More information about TIDAL Masters/MQA can be found here.

CSN is available on Vinyl, CD, 24 Karat Gold CD from Audio Fidelity, the TIDAL Store (16/44.1 kHz FLAC), and iTunes (Mastered for iTunes). If you prefer streaming, it is also available on Spotify and Apple Music.

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