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Air Supply – The Ultimate Collection (Compilation Review)

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Air Supply – The Ultimate Collection (Compilation Review)

Who doesn't like a good ballad? Yes, you in the corner, I see you rolling your eyes, not willing to admit you're a ballad junkie. That's okay, it can be difficult for some of us to acknowledge our emotions, but Air Supply's ballads are just so addictive and easy to sing-along to that even the most emotionally guarded individual will feel compelled to join in, especially when no-one else is watching. It's a great feeling, isn't it? Don't worry, dear reader, this will be just between us, for the magic would be lost if anyone knew our little secret.

Few artists do ballads as well as British–Australian soft rock group Air Supply, but it would be naive to pigeonhole them into that category for their orchestral soft rock styling is so expansive that their peers are a who's who of soft rock culture from the last four decades. While their prime is arguably behind them, their songs, including those written by others, remain timeless and recognisable. Perhaps that is why I'm drawn to The Ultimate Collection because, as the title suggests, it really is the epitome of their creativity.

Love And Other Bruises is an interesting song to commence this career perspective release on as it isn't necessarily one of their best or most popular tunes. Nevertheless, the musicality is there, resulting in an enjoyable beginning to an exceptional collection of songs.

Bring Out The Magic is the reason I suggested it naive to class Air Supply as a ballads-only band. This is soft rock at its finest.

Lost In Love is beautiful!

All Out Of Love is a stunning composition and one of the greatest ballads ever written and recorded.

Every Woman In The World is another stunner. Absolutely sensational!

Just Another Woman offers an interesting shift into the disco-era and immediately reminds me of Elton John's Victim Of Love as the two were somewhat unexpected but thoroughly enjoyable. Just Another Woman is fantastic and despite the shifting style, the song is absolutely worthy of inclusion.

Chances returns the compilation to its ballad-based roots and is thoroughly enjoyable with a vocal presentation that is off-the-charts. The slow build works exceptionally well, and Chances is simply amazing to listen to.

The One That You Love is sonic gold! It may sound like a cliché, but they don't write songs like this anymore. Plus, that drum track is amongst my favourites of all time, only bested by Phil Collins' In The Air Tonight and Dire Straits’ Money For Nothing.

Here I Am is badly placed as the lyrics of The One That You Love also includes the phrase, here I am, throughout. Nevertheless, Here I Am is a lovely ballad that I never tire of. The soundstage and sonic depth of Here I Am is exceptional with a drum track that I adore. 

Sweet Dreams is epic! My recommendation is you turn the volume up when this song comes on, you'll thank me later. Sweet Dreams is one of the best songs ever recorded and that guitar solo and vocal interlude is absolutely incredible.

I’ll Never Get Enough Of You is exceptional! 

This Heart Belongs To Me has a great dual tempo that allows the listener to experience this song in a non-traditional manner, thereby making it truly subjective. This is yet another Air Supply song where the drum tracking is superb. I love it!

Keeping The Love Alive is, as this entire compilation is, exceptional!

Even The Nights Are Better is a song that reminds me of the Carpenters, especially with the vocal styling. That's, of course, a positive reflection as I adore Karen Carpenter's vocal.

Now And Forever is musical perfection. This truly is the ultimate Air Supply collection.

Two Less Lonely People In The World is remarkably good and sounds as fresh today as it did when first released on Air Supply's 1982 release, Now And Forever.

Making Love (Out Of Nothing At All) is a Jim Steinman classic power ballad and is an incredible Air Supply song. I find that I’m torn between this original recording and Bonnie Tyler’s rendition as both are exceptional. 

Young Love is a lovely song and that dual vocal presentation is simply amazing, as is the entire musicality of the song. 

Come What May is a great tune with an incredible soundstage and presence that fills the room. If all music was recorded and mixed this well, we'd never stop listening. As the closing track on The Ultimate Collection, it certainly compels me to listen to the compilation again and stay within Air Supply's back catalogue.

There is little doubt regarding my love of Air Supply and The Ultimate Collection release. It is so good that everyone should have a copy in their collection. Unfortunately, it has yet to receive a vinyl release and while I'm not opposed to picking it up on CD, the TIDAL Hi-Fi CD-quality stream is more than adequate.

The Ultimate Collection is available on CD, the TIDAL Store (16/44.1kHz FLAC), and iTunes.

If you prefer streaming, The Ultimate Collection is available on TIDAL Hi-Fi and Apple Music

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Billy Joel – An Innocent Man (Album Review)

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Billy Joel – An Innocent Man (Album Review)

Billy Joel has an exceptional back catalogue that would be the envy of many musicians. While Storm Front will always be my personal favourite, An Innocent Man, not unlike Joel's sensational Greatest Hits, Vols. 1 & 2, is about as close to perfection as you can get. Yes, dear reader, An Innocent Man plays like a greatest hits release and should be in all serious music collections.

While it has never made it to my physical collection, I have promised myself the Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab (MFSL) double LP release that has been mastered from the original master tapes using MOFI’s patented GAIN 2™ technology. While all the acronyms look impressive, I have a number of these releases and they are simply astonishing and make CD-quality streaming services, like TIDAL Hi-Fi, sound lifeless and flat by comparison. Speaking of TIDAL Hi-Fi, this review is based on listening to and enjoying that edition. I’ve also taken the time to appreciate An Innocent Man on Apple Music and have found the two streaming services are comparable to each other as they are derived from the same master. However, the Apple Music stream, for An Innocent Man, is about five percent louder. The additional loudness could be due to any number of production reasons, but louder volumes do give the faux perception of better quality. Now, I'm not suggesting this is the case, but it would be naive to ignore the possibility. Of course, if the volume is extended too far, the sound will degrade as a result of increased distortion; a key problem in the loudness wars. Correct management of volume, particularly in the recording, mixing, and mastering stages, is a fine line that has sadly been crossed far too often. That all said, both streams sound exceptional, but when an album is of this calibre, it will sound good regardless of lossy or lossless compression algorithms.

Without doubt, An Innocent Man, is one of the greatest albums from the 80s, but the launch window would result in a disappointing result for Joel as Michael Jackson's Thriller won the Grammy for Album Of The Year over An Innocent Man. While Jackson's Thriller is a landmark album, one I thoroughly enjoy, I'd argue that Joel’s An Innocent Man is a better album and has also stood the test of time much better than Thriller which, in my subjective opinion, is starting to sound a little dated. Perhaps An Innocent Man avoided the dreaded dating of its sound as Joel based the writing of the album on his beloved, and arguably timeless, 50s and 60s music styles. The continuous lighthearted Be-bop, Soul, and R&B styling is addictive and remarkably well suited to Joel.

Easy Money has a sensational beat – thank you Liberty DeVito! It’s a fun little song to start the album with, but the chorus isn't compelling as I find it a little distracting with it’s downbeat shift. Nevertheless, Easy Money is a great song that sets the listener up for the music they’re about to hear on the album.

An Innocent Man slows the pace of the album a little, but the transition never sounds out-of-place. When listening to An Innocent Man, you really begin to comprehend what a sensational vocalist Joel is. Joel has incredible control of his vocal and takes it right to the edge, ensuring the presentation is nothing short of a pleasure to listen to. I could listen to this song indefinitely, it is that good.

The Longest Time is, as Uptown Girl is, one of the most enjoyable songs to sing along to. Seriously, tell me you can sit and listen without singing along to this classic. Even if only in your mind, it’s addictive. I love it!

This Night really opens up throughout the chorus. Yes, the whole song is fantastic, but as a Ludwig van Beethoven fan, I really appreciate how Joel merged his vision with that of Beethoven’s. The result is a sonic interpretation that is absolutely timeless. A masterpiece!

Tell Her About It has a fantastic upbeat tempo that will have you toe-tapping and head-bopping from the very first note.

Uptown Girl is my song. It, along with Starship's We Built This City, is responsible for my love of music. Absolutely brilliant!

Careless Talk shifts the style of the album and can sound a little out-of-place following the upbeat sound of Tell Her About It and Uptown Girl. However, as a song on its own, it’s a solid recording, but if there were a B-side on An Innocent Man, it would be Careless Talk.

Christie Lee is a sensational rock tune with an exceptional saxophone element. I love it! You’ll most certainly want to turn the volume up on this song.

Leave A Tender Moment Alone is a stunningly beautiful ballad.

Keeping The Faith is a song I’ve always enjoyed, but it’s a strange song to conclude the album with as it’s somewhat different to the songs that came before it. It sounds too modern for the album’s style, but as a song on its own, it's extraordinary!

Overall, An Innocent Man is an astonishingly good album and one of Joel's best, if not his best. If you want to listen to a flawless album, that is also timeless, then this is the album for you. Pure perfection!

An Innocent Man is available on Vinyl, SACD, CD, the TIDAL Store (16/44.1kHz FLAC), and iTunes (Mastered for iTunes).

If you prefer streaming, An Innocent Man is available on TIDAL Hi-Fi, Apple Music, and Spotify.

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Elton John – Leather Jackets (Album Review)

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Elton John – Leather Jackets (Album Review)

Leather Jackets failed to set the world on fire from both sales and critical review perspectives, but was Leather Jackets just a quick-to-market money-spinning effort, with leftover songs from the Ice On Fire recording sessions, or are there a few hidden gems to be heard? Let's find out!

Leather Jackets is your classic bad 80s pop song, but it's so bad that it's good!

Hoop Of Fire changes the tempo of the album significantly, but it’s a beautiful song.

Don't Trust That Woman has a toe-tapping tempo and a rather compelling chorus, but the Caribbean styling is a little too subdued and I feel the song could have been stronger if it had focused more on that sonic signature.

Go It Alone is another song, that I thoroughly enjoy, with a stellar rhythm. Yes, it is lacking a little spit and polish, but that is strangely appealing for this song.

Gypsy Heart is, as many of the songs are on Leather Jackets, a B-side. However, it’s a lovely song that is worthy of inclusion in John's back catalogue.

Slow Rivers could have been exceptional, especially with the combined talents of John, Bernie Taupin, and Cliff Richard. Sadly, it’s a missed opportunity and a lacklustre song.

Heartache All Over The World is average at best, and that is being generous. It's just bad and when Johns sings Girls, Girls, Girls, all I think of is Mötley Crüe's Girls, Girls, Girls; an infinitely better song.

Angeline has a terrible opening and the song sadly doesn't get any better as it progresses.

Memory Of Love isn't bad if it was a demo. There is a beautiful song hidden here, it's just a shame John wasn’t in the right headspace when recording this album.

Paris is musically and lyrically boring. One of the worst songs on the album and one of John's most disappointing recordings. It’s unstructured and from a composition standpoint is a convoluted nightmare.

I Fall Apart is adequate to close the album with, but it doesn't compel me to listen to Leather Jackets again or stay within John's catalogue. That said, there are some exceptional songs, as referenced throughout this review, to be heard on this album.

Without a doubt, Leather Jackets is the perfect album for the streaming era as one can add songs of interest to a playlist. While I remain a fan of the album format, I can't help but be envious of the younger generations and their digital playlists, for us old-timers would have had to buy an entire album to get maybe one or two worthwhile tracks. I'd like to say that didn't happen very often, but I have many albums with only one killer song. Perhaps that is why I have become increasingly interested in compilation releases as well as favouring streaming.

For this review, I listened to the TIDAL Hi-Fi (CD-quality FLAC) edition and the Apple Music stream. The difference was negligible as the mastering is a little concealed and arguably muffled on both platforms. Hence, any improvement the lossless TIDAL stream may have had over Apple Music becomes irrelevant. Leather Jackets really needs to be remastered, but that would do little to make this album more compelling. While it's a shame that Leather Jackets isn’t a stronger album, there is enough enjoyable music here to listen to the album from time to time.

Leather Jackets is available on CD, the TIDAL Store (16/44.1kHz FLAC) and iTunes.

If you prefer streaming, and for this album, you should, Leather Jackets is available on TIDAL Hi-Fi, Apple Music, and Spotify.

Click here to read other Elton John reviews by Subjective Sounds.  

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Elton John – Ice On Fire (Album Review)

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Elton John – Ice On Fire (Album Review)

Sales and initial impressions may have been lacklustre, but Ice On Fire is, overall, an exceptional Elton John album, albeit with a few B-sides.

Ice On Fire starts off with a song that sounds as though it was leftover from the Victim Of Love recording sessions. Yes, This Town has an upbeat tempo that is reminiscent of the disco era, but one can forgive this inclusion as the song has just enough 80s synth to exist in both time periods. Plus, it is a thoroughly enjoyable and addictive song with some exceptional brass instrumentation.

Cry To Heaven slows the album down significantly with an absolutely gorgeous ballad. Cry To Heaven is one of the best songs on Ice On Fire and, as is often the case, I wonder how this masterpiece has not been more prominent in John's catalogue over the years.

Soul Glove is a great song with a rhythm that will have you toe-tapping and head-bopping in no time.

Nikita, as l've mentioned before, is a compelling song that is a personal favourite. Yes, I still don't know why I like this song so much, but that is okay as sometimes the mystical element is just as important as the subjective meaning. Interestingly, and I only found this out recently, George Michael provided the backing vocals. I had never noticed his inclusion before as his vocal presentation is a little hidden in the mix and quite similar to John’s vocal delivery. That said, now I know, I can absolutely hear and appreciate his input, especially with regards to the higher pitched vocal harmonies towards the end of the song.

Too Young is a solid track, but I find it a little pedestrian, especially considering Queen's John Deacon and Roger Taylor played on the song. For all the talent in the studio, Too Young fails to hit the mark and is, for lack of a better term, a B-side.

Wrap Her Up is awesome, what a sensational song! While it wasn't featured on my beloved The Very Best Of Elton John it did make the VHS video release. I have fond memories of watching that video compilation and listening to this addictive song. I dare you to sit still while listening to Wrap Her Up and try not to sing-along. It can't be done!

Satellite has a killer introduction with a drum beat that I find incredibly satisfying. That said, while I enjoy Satellite, it is a B-side and sounds as though it's a demo waiting for a producer to fully realise its full potential.

Tell Me What The Papers Say is similar to Satellite with regards to sounding like an unrealised demo.

Candy By The Pound is three decades removed from the 80s. It's not a bad song per se, it’s just not suited to John's style or the era. It would have been perfect for any pop performer in the 50s however.

Shoot Down The Moon is another stunning Elton John ballad. However, the ending falls a little flat and could have been better thought out.

The Man Who Never Died (1985 Remix) is sonically beautiful with a wide and deep soundstage. It really is quite special!

Restless (Live At Wembley Stadium 1984), as I've mentioned before, has a good groove, but despite being a live track, the band still isn't jamming and I'd say this is one song that tarnishes the remastered edition of Ice On Fire. Sometimes, bonus tracks just shouldn't be added to an existing album. Although, The Man Who Never Died is an exception to that rule.

Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word (Live Version) is another exception. That said, these live tracks would have been perfect if presented on a second CD. Yes, that wouldn't help with modern day streaming, but one must remember, these remasters were done at the pinnacle of the CD era. Unfortunately, during that time, the general consensus was to fill the capacity of the CD, for no other reason than because you could.

I'm Still Standing (Live At Wembley Stadium 1984) closes out the remastered release nicely and ensures I’ll play the album again and stay within John's catalogue. It isn't the best live performance of this epic song, but it could be argued that it is a true representation of the live sound without overdubbing.

Overall, Ice On Fire is one of John's most satisfying 80s albums, with a number of hits to be heard and some hidden gems that are rarely appreciated outside of the album format.

Ice On Fire is available on CD, the TIDAL Store (16/44.1kHz FLAC), and iTunes.

If you prefer streaming, Ice On Fire is available on TIDAL Hi-Fi, Apple Music, and Spotify.

Click here to read other Elton John reviews by Subjective Sounds. 

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Elton John – Breaking Hearts (Album Review)

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Elton John – Breaking Hearts (Album Review)

The 80s, in many respects, wasn't Elton John's finest decade, but amongst some of the pedestrian B-sides, there is a plentiful amount of stellar songs from his 80s catalogue that you simply have to listen to; some of which can be found on Breaking Hearts.

Breaking Hearts maintained John's classic era band lineup, just as Too Low For Zero did. Without a doubt, there is a level of musicality that feels familiar, harking back to John's 70s era, validating just how important a band can be to the sound of an artist. Yes, John has always been a solo act, with a backing band, but Elton John really could have been an all-inclusive band name, in a similar manner as Alice Cooper presented himself in the early 70s. While it’s understandable that these leading men wanted to branch out and achieve a level of creative freedom, not normally associated with a band lineup, both artists are renowned for their early albums that have stood the test of time and are now considered classics. One should then question if the band dynamic is such a bad thing. Although, don't suggest that to Rob Zombie as he still laments his period as the lead man for White Zombie. Call me sentimental but I like original lineups. It’s subsequently a shame that Breaking Hearts would be the final Elton John album to include the original band lineup. Yes, nothing lasts forever, but while it did, their collaborative efforts produced some of the greatest songs ever recorded.

Restless isn’t a bad song to start the album with. The groove is there, and that electric guitar draws you in, but it isn’t spectacular, sounding as though it was recorded against a click track. It simply sounds as though the band was going through the motions with this song, rather than jamming and improvising. A solid tune, but a missed opportunity.

Slow Down Georgie (She’s Poison) sounds like manufactured pop music. It isn’t necessarily bad, but it hardly shows off the songwriting talent of John and Bernie Taupin, not to mention the original band that collectively brought us so many masterpieces.

Who Wears These Shoes? is a little more fun than the preceding tracks, with a beat and lyrical hook that will see you toe-tapping, head-bopping, and singing along.

Breaking Hearts (Ain't What It Used To Be) is a beautiful ballad.

Li’l ‘Frigerator gives the listener a jolt, especially following such a relaxing ballad. Plus, that entry is just weird – likely trying to separate itself from Breaking Hearts (Ain't What It Used To Be). Regardless, once Li'l 'Frigerator gets going, it's a fun and thoroughly enjoyable song.

Passengers is brilliant. I have always loved it, ever since hearing it for the first time on John’s The Very Best Of compilation. It's quirky in places but is so much fun from the very first note. I do consider it one of John's greatest recordings.

In Neon is a lovely song and one which bemuses me as I ponder how a song this good is not more prominent in John's catalogue.

Burning Buildings blows my mind. It is that good! An absolutely sensational song that has gone largely unacknowledged over the years. I know John already has so many hits, he is an absolute legend, but Burning Buildings is just as good, if not better than many of the fan favourites.

Did He Shoot Her? is a thoroughly enjoyable pop/rock tune. It was never going to win any awards, but Breaking Hearts wouldn't be the same without it.

Sad Songs (Say So Much) is, as l’ve said before, a groovy song that isn't sad at all. It’s also a fantastic way to close Breaking Hearts and encourages me to listen to the album again and stay within John's catalogue.

Overall, Breaking Hearts is a solid release and one of John's best albums from the 80s. While the album was remastered in 2003, the version on Apple Music isn't specific, therefore making me wonder if it isn't simply the original CD mastering. I say that because sonically it’s a little flat while sounding somewhat concealed. Interestingly, however, the iTunes edition of Breaking Hearts is listed as remastered. It’s intriguing and I would love to know if they are different versions. Regardless, it isn't overly detrimental to the enjoyment of the album, but when you've heard the hits so many times, you know how they should sound.

Unfortunately, Breaking Hearts is not available on TIDAL Hi-Fi, so I'm unable to compare and offer any further opinions on the exact mastering used. What I can say with certainty, however, is that Breaking Hearts is not Mastered for iTunes, therefore making it more likely that the Apple Music edition may be sourced from the original CD mastering. Despite this, it’s still thoroughly enjoyable to listen to for this music-first audiophile.

Breaking Hearts is available on CD and iTunes.

If you prefer streaming, Breaking Hearts is available on Apple Music and Spotify.

Click here to read other Elton John reviews by Subjective Sounds.

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Elton John – Jump Up! (Album Review)

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Elton John – Jump Up! (Album Review)

I’m an album guy. Playlists are a cool modern take on the good old mixtape, but despite being once known as the Mixtape Master, I much prefer to experience music in the album format as it generally showcases a particular era and style that correlates and often complements the artist. That said, sometimes albums have mismatched tracks and that is certainly the case with Elton John’s 1982 release, Jump Up!

Much of Jump Up! is excellent, well except for the intro track, but more on that shortly. The album artwork is also permanently lodged in the 80s, but I think in some ways that is an appealing aspect. Yes, dear readers, as I age the nostalgic element is becoming more pronounced. Jump Up! likely won't appeal to the fans that are mainly interested in the hits, even though this release features the fan favourite Blue Eyes. Jump Up! May lack focus, but don’t let that deter you for there is enough intriguing music to be found on this release to please all Elton John fans. 

This review is based on listening to the 2003 remastered editions on both TIDAL Hi-Fi and Apple Music. To be completely frank, there is almost no difference to be heard and if anything I find the FLAC version via TIDAL Hi-Fi to be a little more clinical, therefore less relaxful. It isn’t always about resolution and file size. There is little doubt that, for this album, I prefer the Apple Music stream.

Dear John why did you record this song? Seriously, it's horrid! An absolutely terrible start to the album. I honestly can’t think of a worse song, from any album, as the lead track. Although, I’m sure there are plenty. Dear John, please never write and record another song like this one.

Spiteful Child flows on nicely from Dear John and is a much better song. That said, John’s vocal delivery in the chorus can become a little tiresome and I find myself being drawn into the musical accompaniment. It’s layered, diverse, and has a solid soundstage. What's not to like? Oh, that’s right, John's harmony as he delivers the chorus.

Ball & Chain is awesome! It would have been perfect for Tumbleweed Connection, but it works really well here. Ball & Chain has a great groove and fans of The Who may be interested to know the acoustic guitar on this song is strummed by none other than Pete Townsend.

Legal Boys is beautiful! The musicality is beyond reproach as is John's vocal delivery. How is this song not more prominent in his catalogue?

I Am Your Robot is unique; I like it! It’s 80s toe-tapping and head-bopping gold and I'm actually surprised that no one in the hip-hop world has sampled I Am Your Robot. There is greatness hidden here and with the right artist, I Am Your Robot could morph into something amazing. Just so long as they don’t transition into Blue Eyes. It has always amazed me that Blue Eyes was never the lead track on Side B. While CD and associated streaming has largely ignored the sides of a record, Jump Up! was released when Vinyl and Cassettes were the dominant formats and Blue Eyes simply doesn’t flow well after I Am Your Robot.

Blue Eyes is likely the most popular song from Jump Up! Okay, it’s probably the only song off the album that most listeners would have heard. Regardless, as I reflect on what I’ve said previously about Blue Eyes, I stand by my statement that I’m glad John didn't sing consistently in this lower register, that is reminiscent of many a piano bar singer. Nevertheless, Blue Eyes a great song and one can understand why it has become a fan favourite.

Empty Garden (Hey Hey Johnny) is a beautiful Taupin / John collaborative song that was written as a tribute to John Lennon. It’s one of John's greatest recordings and one that I've no doubt you'll appreciate when you listen to it. I could, seriously, listen to Empty Garden (Hey Hey Johnny) on repeat for hours, it is that good!

Princess follows Empty Garden (Hey Hey Johnny) seamlessly and is an absolute classic. Yes, it is a little campy, but it’s a lovely song that works extremely well and this time John nailed his vocal range in the chorus.

Where Have All The Good Times Gone is a great tune. A B-side, yes, but great nonetheless.

All Quiet On The Western Front is sensational despite the commercial failure of the song as a single. Musically it’s gorgeous and the anti-war message will always be relevant. As I listen, I feel compelled to turn the volume up as the sonic elements, especially that drum track, blows my mind. This is one song I'd love to hear in surround sound and I feel in some ways it is out of place on Jump Up! It would have been perfect for inclusion on Madman Across The Water. Regardless, All Quiet On The Western Front compels me to stay within John’s catalogue.

Overall, Jump Up!, while not commercially one of John’s greatest albums, is thoroughly enjoyable. I would have dumped Dear John and re-tracked the album so that Blue Eyes was better presented, but I guess that’s what playlists are for.

Jump Up! is available on CD, the TIDAL Store (16/44.1kHz FLAC), and iTunes.

If you prefer streaming, Jump Up! is also available on TIDAL Hi-Fi and Spotify.

Click here to read other Elton John reviews by Subjective Sounds.

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Elton John – The Fox (Album Review)

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Elton John – The Fox (Album Review)

Longtime readers would likely be aware of my admiration for Elton John's back catalogue, especially those albums that didn’t get the recognition they deserved. However, I also call a spade a spade and while a number of the songs featured on The Fox were from the recording sessions of the exceptional 21 At 33, sadly the sparkle of that album failed to make it to The Fox. That’s not to say that The Fox is categorically a bad album, but it is a collection of B-sides. Of course, a B-side for Elton John would be akin to a hit for many other artists, therefore, one shouldn’t be too harsh in their assessment of this album; even if the cover is uninspiring and obscure. Nevertheless, let’s listen to the music and see if there are any redeeming qualities that may appeal to listeners other than John’s diehard fans.

Breaking Down Barriers isn't a bad tune, the musicality is beautiful with an addictive beat, but it lacks the spit and polish often associated with John's recordings. Nevertheless, I thoroughly enjoy the mix and the depth of the soundstage.

Heart In The Right Place has a moody rhythm that I enjoy. It reminds me of some of John's earliest recordings and it's a great song with yet another excellent mix. It gets better the more you listen to it and in many ways, that’s a sign of a good song.

Just Like Belgium is a solid pop-rock tune. Nothing to write home about though. Although, as with many of the tracks on the album, the musicality and mix are excellent, making for a rather enjoyable listening experience.

Nobody Wins has a compelling beat that is stuck in the 80s, yet I love it as I lived through that era and the music expression of the time was certainly unique. Nobody Wins is one of the best songs on the album.

Fascist Faces is average at best. It just proves that despite the incredible collaboration efforts of John and Taupin, not every song they wrote together was a hit.

Carla / Etude / Fanfare / Chloe is a lovely song, or collection of songs, that is truly worthy of being a part of John's back catalogue. While much of The Fox is a missed opportunity, this recording, in particular, is a hit and deserves to be heard. Absolutely beautiful!

Heels Of The Wind is an enjoyable B-side that works well within the album format.

Elton's Song was rather controversial at the time of release. However, if the song was released today I dare say it wouldn't receive the same level of pushback and negative press. Actually, it would be interesting to see John reissue Elton's Song as a single as I feel it would be well received and finally receive the credit it deserves for not only its subject matter, but its simple, yet complex, composition. A lovely song!

The Fox follows Elton's Song nicely and is a fantastic song to close the album with ensuring I'll stay within John's catalogue, even if I don’t immediately listen to The Fox again. Although the album does grow on you the more you listen to it.

Overall, The Fox is a solid album but one can’t deny that it isn’t one of John’s greatest releases. It’s highly likely that The Fox will only ever appeal to his most dedicated fans. That said, I implore you to give it a listen as there are a couple of hidden gems to be heard and you may end up thoroughly enjoying the album.

The Fox is available on CD, the TIDAL Store (16/44.1kHz FLAC), and iTunes.

If you prefer streaming, The Fox is also available on TIDAL Hi-Fi and Spotify.

Click here to read other Elton John reviews by Subjective Sounds.

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Elton John – 21 At 33 (Album Review)

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Elton John – 21 At 33 (Album Review)

We all know the classics, but it constantly amazes me how much exceptional music Elton John has recorded throughout his career, yet much of it has gone unnoticed, having never been played live or included on John’s various career perspective releases. 21 At 33 should be a classic, but most listeners would have only heard Little Jeannie. While Little Jeanie is exceptional in its own right, one shouldn't ignore 21 At 33 for there are numerous hidden gems to be heard on this release.

Unlike John's previous Disco-based release, Victim Of Love, 21 At 33 sees John return to his pop-rock roots. Although, if you listen closely, there are a couple of songs whereby the Disco-era rubbed off, resulting in a thoroughly enjoyable musical hybrid.

Chasing The Crown starts the album off with plenty of energy, but I don't feel Chasing The Crown is the ideal lead track. Personally, I would have made it the first song on Side B, if we were to consider 21 At 33 as a vinyl release.

Little Jeannie is a lovely ballad and would have been a better lead track for 21 At 33. Upon its release, it was a high-charting single in the United States. Although, it failed to set any records in the United Kingdom and subsequently has gone largely unplayed on John’s live setlist since the early 80s. At least it was included on his latest career perspective, Diamonds. Little Jeanie is certainly worthy of such recognition, but that could be said for so many of John’s songs.

Sartorial Eloquence was never going to be a song that fans could easily sing-a-long to, but I adore it! The chorus is superb and when I think of Elton John's style, this song certainly resonates. The vocal, piano, along with all backing elements are perfectly mixed, making for an even more captivating experience for the listener.

Two Rooms At The End Of The World is one of my all-time favourite Elton John songs. The rhythm is off-the-charts and it gets me toe-tapping and head-bopping every time. Sensational!

White Lady White Powder is a solid tune. Nothing to write home about, but if you’re an Eagles fan, as I am, you may be interested to know that Don Henley, Glenn Frey, and Timothy B. Schmit provided the backing vocals for this track. That said, the mix fails to amplify this fact and that's an incredible shame as John had three of the world's greatest vocalists backing him up, yet failed to capitalise on their collective musical talents. Perhaps more distressing is this was a Taupin/John collaboration. A missed opportunity? Definitely! Although, the album wouldn’t be the same without White Lady White Powder.

Dear God is another lovely ballad and reminds me somewhat of the sonic qualities John would later explore throughout the late 80s and 90s on songs such as Sacrifice.

Never Gonna Fall In Love Again is sensational from start to finish. It may be a B-side, but that doesn't mean it's substandard. It’s one of the best songs on the album.

Take Me Back is a country-pop song that John performs exceptionally well. It would have fit incredibly well on Tumbleweed Connection, but feels a little out-of-place on 21 At 33.

Give Me The Love is a perfect song to close the album with. The musical introduction is gorgeous and even though John sings with a slight southern (Elvis-inspired) style, it suits the song perfectly and encourages me to listen to the album again and stay within John’s catalogue.

Overall, 21 At 33 is an exceptional album that is severely underrated. Perhaps I just like backing the underdog, but John's catalogue is so full of exceptional music that it would be an impossible task to put a compilation together. Perhaps that is why so many of his career perspective releases feature the fan favourites and chart-topping hits. Regardless, you’d be well advised to further explore John’s back catalogue as the hits are only an introduction to an absolute legend with very few peers. 

While not Mastered for iTunes, the remastered edition on Apple Music is superb and 21 At 33 really comes alive, compelling me to keep an eye out for the CD or a possible vinyl reissue in the not too distant future.

21 At 33 is available on CD and iTunes.

If you prefer streaming, 21 At 33 is also available on Spotify.

Click here to read other Elton John reviews by Subjective Sounds.

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(When The Sun Sets Over) Carlton – [Compilation Review]

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(When The Sun Sets Over) Carlton – [Compilation Review]

Few would argue about the influence of Melbourne's music scene in the 70s, for it was the mecca of the Australian Music Industry at the time. That said, I'm sure my Sydney neighbours would fervently disagree. While I’m Sydney born and bred, good music is good music and (When The Sun Sets Over) Carlton validates that point. With a runtime nearing three hours, this compilation is an extensive trip down memory lane, but will also excite those of us that missed out on experiencing this wonderfully vibrant music scene during its heyday.

SkyhooksCarlton (Lygon Street Limbo) is the perfect song to open this compilation. Not only were Skyhooks one of the most successful bands on the scene, at the time, but Carlton (Lygon Street Limbo) incorporates the energy and musicality of the 70s. A sensational song!

The SportsWho Listens To The Radio? (Original 7" Version) is one of my all-time favourite songs, having heard it repeatedly, ironically, on the radio. Yet, until listening to this compilation, I never knew who the artist was. Now I do and I have this compilation and streaming music to thank for bringing me back to one of the coolest songs from the era.

Jo Jo Zep & The FalconsSo Young is another sensational song and reminds me, in spirit, of Tom Petty. I love it!

The DotsLowdown is a little rough around the edges, but that adds to the character of the song. However, I’d argue that while Lowdown isn't a standout song, it is thoroughly enjoyable and the compilation wouldn't be the same without it.

StilettoMiddle Of The Bed is a sensational classic with a killer vocal, rhythm, and an intriguing guitar tune.

The Bleeding HeartsHit Single has a disjointed musical style that surprisingly works perfectly. Hit Single is dynamic and never dull. I don't know about you, dear reader, but it’s a hit from my perspective. It also has a slight Skyhooks influence; what's not to like?

Mighty KongHard Drugs (Are Bad For You) is another rhythmic monster. Seriously, you have to listen to this compilation, it is hit after hit. Incredible!

Mondo RockPrimal Park is a solid tune but it has a little too much pop-influence for my liking. However, there are certain elements, such as the chorus, that are spot on and thoroughly enjoyable.

Mark GillespieSuicide Sister is pure perfection!

High Rise BombersFaster Than Light is a great song. That brass section undoubtedly makes the song and I could happily listen to Faster Than Light on repeat for hours.

The ToadsEudil is addictive. Yes, even that interesting near-pop-based backing vocal grows on you; the song would be lost without it.

The Pelaco BrosMechanics In A Relaxed Manner isn't a bad blues-based tune, but I find the mix confuses my mind as the vocal presentation is too forward and slightly offbeat to the rhythm. In some respects, it is as though two songs have morphed into one.

The Relaxed MechanicsTruckin' Casanova is a campy tune, but I can't help but love it. An absolute classic and arguably a song that only an Australian band could have conjured up.

MillionairesGossip has a shifting tempo that takes a little getting used to. It isn't my favourite song from the compilation, but there was bound to be at least one of the tracks that didn't connect with me.

The KevinsOut At Night is a great song. Yes, another campy tongue-in-cheek song, but such is Australian humour.

Martin Armiger & Buzz LeesonNo Reason is a killer classic rock tune.

ParachuteThe Big Beat isn't anything to write home about, but the compilation wouldn't be the same without it.

Spare ChangeLet's Get Rich Together is one of those songs that takes repeat listens to truly enjoy. That said, once the connection is made, you'll be hypnotised by this exceptional song.

The Glory BoysThe Ballad Of Good & Evil is a fantastic song. The rhythm is amazing, but that vocal delivery is off-the-charts. So Good!

Eric Gradman Man And MachineCrime Of Passion is a solid song with an interesting vocal overlay. The sonic shift, mid-song, is also intriguing and while I'm unsure of how I really feel about Crime Of Passion, it suits the compilation perfectly.

Martin ArmigerI Love My Car is certainly reminiscent of the era, but I’d argue that it’s not quite worthy of this collection.

The Bleeding HeartsBoys (Greg Macainsh Demo Version) is a great track. It kinda makes me wonder what the non-demo version sounds like as this edition was already ready for prime-time in my opinion.

StilettoRozalyn is a killer song. The vocal delivery, in particular, is absolutely sensational, making for one of the best songs on the compilation. That said, there is a little sibilance in the vocal that can be distracting, especially when listening via headphones.

The DotsI See Red is rather rough around the edges, reminding me a little of the early Rolling Stones and Bob Dylan recordings. Overall, however, it isn't a bad song but it could have been great with a little more spit and polish.

Jo Jo Zep & The FalconsOnly The Lonely Hearted isn’t a song to write home about, but it's a solid addition to this compilation.

The SportsSuddenly is a great song that improves upon each listen. I love the vocal style and Suddenly is perfectly mixed.

Mondo RockTelephone Booth has a great rhythm that is full of energy. I dare say Telephone Booth would have been exceptional when played live.

Daddy CoolSaturday Night (GTK Live) is merely satisfactory as there are much better Daddy Cool songs that could have been selected for this compilation.

SkyhooksHey, What's The Matter? (Steve Hill Demo Version) is awesome! Although, the final master recording is even better. Regardless, it's Skyhooks, what is not to like?

Company CaineBuzzin’ With My Cousin is a little too left of the centre for me. That doesn't mean that you won't like it, but I just don’t connect with it.

Captain Matchbox Whoopee BandRoll That Reefer is different and feels out-of-place, but it’s certainly a compelling tune.

Stephen Cummings & Dave FlettThe Third Degree sounds too much like The Rolling Stones. That isn’t necessarily a bad thing, as the song is excellent, but I do value uniqueness.

Rock GraniteYou Got Me Where You Want Me is a toe-tapper and a head-bopper. Great tune!

Jo Jo Zep & The FalconsSomeday It's Gonna Come To You (1976 Demo Version) is far better than the demo tag would make you believe. A sensational song!

Mark GillespieComin' Back For More is thoroughly enjoyable.

AutodriftersLocked Out Of Love is not my type of song, but you may enjoy it; especially if you're a Hank Williams fan.

Fabulous NudesI'll Be A Dag For You, Baby is daggy! It isn't the greatest song and should have been omitted from the compilation.

The Pelaco BrosTruckdrivin' Guru is a solid song, but nothing to write home about and again we have a song that is somewhat influenced by The Rolling Stones. I guess imitation is really the sincerest form of flattery.

Peter Lillie & The LeisuremastersHangin' Round The House is brilliant! An Aussie Classic!

The SportsLive Work & Play (Nightmoves Live) isn't a bad song but I'm more interested in the polish that often accompanies studio recordings. That said, this is a strong live performance with plenty of energy.

High Rise BombersRadio Show is a great song and that jam session mid-song is superb.

Eric Gradman Man & MachineBright Boy has an addictive beat and is overall an exceptional song.

SkyhooksThis Is My City is a great way to close this compilation. It ensures that I'll listen again as Skyhooks can do no wrong in my opinion.

For those of you calculating the track listing, some will wonder why there are only 43 songs reviewed, rather than the 45 included on the album. Sadly, likely due to contractual permissions, Daddy Cool’s Boy You're Paranoid and The Indelible Murtceps' Blue Movies Made Me Cry are missing from streaming services. This discrepancy is yet another reason why owning the CD is a good idea as you're not limited to accessing the music you love by outside influences that are out of your control. Despite this, (When The Sun Sets Over) Carlton is an incredible compilation of Australian artists from the 70s and the reputable Melbourne music scene. While there are a couple of songs that don't connect with my soul, the compilation as a whole does. Subsequently, every song, regardless of my subjective viewpoint, is essential.

(When The Sun Sets Over) Carlton is available on CD, the TIDAL Store (16/44.1kHz FLAC), and iTunes. It’s important to note that the aforementioned absent songs are available if you purchase the album.

If the omission of those two songs doesn’t worry you, you can also stream (When The Sun Sets Over) Carlton on Spotify and Apple Music.

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REO Speedwagon/Chicago (Concert Review)

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REO Speedwagon/Chicago (Concert Review)

I went to high school and college in the 1970s and 1980s. As a result, the music I prefer is from that time period. And the many concerts I attend are artists and groups from those eras. Recently I had the pleasure of enjoying a band that has been making music for over 50 years: Chicago.

But first, let’s start with the opening act, REO Speedwagon.

The first time I saw REO was in July 2003. I remember thinking at that time that lead singer Kevin Cronin talked a lot! In the 15 years that have elapsed, nothing has changed! However, his talking between songs was showing appreciation to the fans. He acknowledged that without us, there would be no REO Speedwagon. As fans, we pay good money for concert tickets, merchandise, physical media, and streaming services. It’s nice to hear that the artist is aware of this, and recognizes it. Many artists don’t.

REO played their hits, including, “Take It On The Run,” “Roll With The Changes,” “Can’t Fight This Feeling,” and “Keep On Loving You.” REO performed like they wanted to be there, not as if they were begrudgingly fulfilling an obligation. At 66 years old Cronin can still sing the hits like it’s 1980.

The show ended with a tribute to Tom Petty. Cronin told the story of how Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers was his favorite band (as is mine), and that he and Petty were neighbors in Southern California. The band dedicated “Listen To Her Heart” to Petty. REO kept it simple and beautiful.

Chicago was the headliner, and based on the crowd reaction, they were ready to party. But the mood grew quiet as Chicago announced they would be playing their album, Chicago II in its entirety. The only songs most fans recognized were “Make Me Smile,” “Color My World,” and “25 or 6 to 4.”  While they sounded great, it was a bit of a bore, as most people, including myself, like to hear the hits from a band that has been around more than 20 years, and in this case, more than 50.

The crowd woke up once the classic rock section began: “Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?,” “Beginnings,” “Saturday In The Park,” “If You Leave Me Now.” The brass section, including original members James Pankow and Lee Loughnane, were having the time of their lives, and sounded amazing. Another original member, Robert Lamm, sang with as much enthusiasm as he did when he first performed these songs 40 plus years ago.

The highlight of Chicago’s set was the Spencer Davis Group cover of, “I’m A Man.” Drummer Walfredo Reyes, Jr., and percussionist Ramon Yslas couldn’t have enjoyed themselves more banging on the drums, bongos, tambourine, occasionally trading places without missing a beat.

I would have preferred for Chicago to skip playing the album and focus on the hits. Their catalog is so vast, ranging from rock to brass to pop, that there’s a little something for everyone. While this wasn’t my favorite Chicago concert, if they come back to my area I will be in the audience once again.

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