Despite owning this compilation, I have never considered myself to be a major fan of Rod Stewart’s music and while I own Every Picture Tells A Story and Time, the desire to research and collect his entire catalog is simply not as strong as it is with the other artists that I collect. As good as his studio albums are, when I think of Rod Stewart, I think of the decades of incredible music, spread amongst no fewer than 30 albums. It is that kind of back catalog that compels one to appreciate the succinctness of compilation-based albums.

While I would love to embed the album from TIDAL et al, this compilation isn't available on any streaming service. It isn’t even available for purchase on iTunes. However, let’s not be discouraged as I have painstakingly constructed a playlist of the songs. TIDAL will, of course, be embedded below, but I have also made the playlist available for Spotify users.

Maggie May really needs no introduction, yet it is the perfect song to commence any Rod Stewart compilation with.

You Wear It Well instantly reminds me of numerous Neil Young recordings. That is, of course, until Stewart's raspy vocal kicks in. While I enjoy this song, I find that I get the most enjoyment from the instrumentation as I feel Stewart's vocal is somewhat lost in the soundstage. It results in a muddiness that is distracting.

Baby Jane is a catchy tune. I love it as it gets my body moving.

Da Ya Think I'm Sexy is one of the greatest Disco-era tunes ever recorded. It is addictive and there is little doubt that you will sing that addictive chorus to your significant other at some point in time. If you do, I just hope the following song, in your playlist, is not (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction by The Rolling Stones.

I Was Only Joking is a lovely semi-acoustic ballad that really highlights Stewart's unique vocal style. The song is soothing and while directly opposite in tempo to Da Ya Think I'm Sexy, the transition doesn't feel out of place. Actually, I would say the tracking of this compilation is well thought out, which sadly is a rarity amongst career perspective compilations.

This Old Heart Of Mine is a solid song that I thoroughly enjoy, but it is nothing to write home about.

Sailing is pure perfection. It doesn't get any better than this!

I Don't Want To Talk About It is another Rod Stewart classic. What an incredible artist! This song is so delicate and could have been over-performed, but Stewart reaches deep while remaining restrained in a true showcase of professionalism.

You're In My Heart has a gorgeous acoustic introduction that gradually builds as the song plays. You may not sing-a-long to the verse, but the chorus compels you to do so. Not only is it catchy, but the use of backing singers, in the chorus, is ideal for the composition of the song. You're In My Heart is a classic song that will continue to stand the test of time; provided love prevails of course.

Young Turks is a faster-paced tune that reminds me of Dire Straits. While I should love it, I just feel there is something missing and the click track beat is a little monotonous. It isn't a bad song, but is it worthy of a Best Of compilation?

What Am I Gonna Do (I'm So In Love With You) is campy and whiny. I'm sorry to those of you that enjoy this song, but this is one song that I would skip over if given the chance. I feel it is overproduced with a lackluster performance.

The First Cut Is The Deepest is gorgeous!

The Killing Of Georgie (Part I And II) is sonic heaven and nothing short of a masterpiece. I love it!

Tonight's The Night has an incredible rhythm and I adore Stewart's vocal delivery on this track.

Every Beat Of My Heart is one of the best songs Stewart ever recorded. Every aspect of this song is perfect and Bob Ezrin certainly pushed Stewart to, and beyond, the limit with the production of this song. Sometimes a producer is as important as the artist and Ezrin rarely disappoints. His work with Alice Cooper, alone, is legendary. Ezrin is one of the greatest producers in the history of recorded music. If you see his name attached to an album, buy it!

Downtown Train is the first Rod Stewart song that I recall hearing. For that reason alone, it has a very special place in my heart. It is a perfect way to end this compilation and while Stewart continues to record new and engaging music, this 1989 release, in a similar way to Elton John's The Very Best Of, highlights the most well-known tracks from the pinnacle of Stewart's success.

I don't know about you, but I feel like listening to this album again. The collection, overall, is exceptional and is one of my prized possessions.

For this review, I listened to the Warner Bros. (7599-26034-2) CD. Overall the mastering was good but uneven in places. It is honestly difficult to find a compilation that doesn't suffer from this problem as songs are recorded in different studios, with different producers, and varied artistic abilities, depending on when the song was written and recorded. A perfect example of this, that springs to mind, would be if a Michael Jackson compilation featured both Ben and Man In The Mirror. Both are great songs in their own right, but from an artistic and musicality standpoint, they are worlds apart.

A fold-out CD booklet is included but it’s barebones, including only a single additional photograph. The only other detail included, in the liner notes, is a replication of the production information that is plastered on the rear cover. Yes, I have seen far worse album layouts, especially for compilations, but it is tedious to find that one song you really want to listen to. Seriously, who thought a rear album artwork layout, with production information, was a good idea? I’m certainly a proponent of including full production notes, but that is what liner notes are for.

The Best Of Rod Stewart is currently available on CD. Unfortunately, it remains absent from all streaming services and digital download stores.

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