Sales and initial impressions may have been lacklustre, but Ice On Fire is, overall, an exceptional Elton John album, albeit with a few B-sides.

Ice On Fire starts off with a song that sounds as though it was leftover from the Victim Of Love recording sessions. Yes, This Town has an upbeat tempo that is reminiscent of the disco era, but one can forgive this inclusion as the song has just enough 80s synth to exist in both time periods. Plus, it is a thoroughly enjoyable and addictive song with some exceptional brass instrumentation.

Cry To Heaven slows the album down significantly with an absolutely gorgeous ballad. Cry To Heaven is one of the best songs on Ice On Fire and, as is often the case, I wonder how this masterpiece has not been more prominent in John's catalogue over the years.

Soul Glove is a great song with a rhythm that will have you toe-tapping and head-bopping in no time.

Nikita, as l've mentioned before, is a compelling song that is a personal favourite. Yes, I still don't know why I like this song so much, but that is okay as sometimes the mystical element is just as important as the subjective meaning. Interestingly, and I only found this out recently, George Michael provided the backing vocals. I had never noticed his inclusion before as his vocal presentation is a little hidden in the mix and quite similar to John’s vocal delivery. That said, now I know, I can absolutely hear and appreciate his input, especially with regards to the higher pitched vocal harmonies towards the end of the song.

Too Young is a solid track, but I find it a little pedestrian, especially considering Queen's John Deacon and Roger Taylor played on the song. For all the talent in the studio, Too Young fails to hit the mark and is, for lack of a better term, a B-side.

Wrap Her Up is awesome, what a sensational song! While it wasn't featured on my beloved The Very Best Of Elton John it did make the VHS video release. I have fond memories of watching that video compilation and listening to this addictive song. I dare you to sit still while listening to Wrap Her Up and try not to sing-along. It can't be done!

Satellite has a killer introduction with a drum beat that I find incredibly satisfying. That said, while I enjoy Satellite, it is a B-side and sounds as though it's a demo waiting for a producer to fully realise its full potential.

Tell Me What The Papers Say is similar to Satellite with regards to sounding like an unrealised demo.

Candy By The Pound is three decades removed from the 80s. It's not a bad song per se, it’s just not suited to John's style or the era. It would have been perfect for any pop performer in the 50s however.

Shoot Down The Moon is another stunning Elton John ballad. However, the ending falls a little flat and could have been better thought out.

The Man Who Never Died (1985 Remix) is sonically beautiful with a wide and deep soundstage. It really is quite special!

Restless (Live At Wembley Stadium 1984), as I've mentioned before, has a good groove, but despite being a live track, the band still isn't jamming and I'd say this is one song that tarnishes the remastered edition of Ice On Fire. Sometimes, bonus tracks just shouldn't be added to an existing album. Although, The Man Who Never Died is an exception to that rule.

Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word (Live Version) is another exception. That said, these live tracks would have been perfect if presented on a second CD. Yes, that wouldn't help with modern day streaming, but one must remember, these remasters were done at the pinnacle of the CD era. Unfortunately, during that time, the general consensus was to fill the capacity of the CD, for no other reason than because you could.

I'm Still Standing (Live At Wembley Stadium 1984) closes out the remastered release nicely and ensures I’ll play the album again and stay within John's catalogue. It isn't the best live performance of this epic song, but it could be argued that it is a true representation of the live sound without overdubbing.

Overall, Ice On Fire is one of John's most satisfying 80s albums, with a number of hits to be heard and some hidden gems that are rarely appreciated outside of the album format.

Ice On Fire is available on CD, the TIDAL Store (16/44.1kHz FLAC), and iTunes.

If you prefer streaming, Ice On Fire is available on TIDAL Hi-Fi, Apple Music, and Spotify.

Click here to read other Elton John reviews by Subjective Sounds. 

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