We all know the classics, but it constantly amazes me how much exceptional music Elton John has recorded throughout his career, yet much of it has gone unnoticed, having never been played live or included on John’s various career perspective releases. 21 At 33 should be a classic, but most listeners would have only heard Little Jeannie. While Little Jeanie is exceptional in its own right, one shouldn't ignore 21 At 33 for there are numerous hidden gems to be heard on this release.

Unlike John's previous Disco-based release, Victim Of Love, 21 At 33 sees John return to his pop-rock roots. Although, if you listen closely, there are a couple of songs whereby the Disco-era rubbed off, resulting in a thoroughly enjoyable musical hybrid.

Chasing The Crown starts the album off with plenty of energy, but I don't feel Chasing The Crown is the ideal lead track. Personally, I would have made it the first song on Side B, if we were to consider 21 At 33 as a vinyl release.

Little Jeannie is a lovely ballad and would have been a better lead track for 21 At 33. Upon its release, it was a high-charting single in the United States. Although, it failed to set any records in the United Kingdom and subsequently has gone largely unplayed on John’s live setlist since the early 80s. At least it was included on his latest career perspective, Diamonds. Little Jeanie is certainly worthy of such recognition, but that could be said for so many of John’s songs.

Sartorial Eloquence was never going to be a song that fans could easily sing-a-long to, but I adore it! The chorus is superb and when I think of Elton John's style, this song certainly resonates. The vocal, piano, along with all backing elements are perfectly mixed, making for an even more captivating experience for the listener.

Two Rooms At The End Of The World is one of my all-time favourite Elton John songs. The rhythm is off-the-charts and it gets me toe-tapping and head-bopping every time. Sensational!

White Lady White Powder is a solid tune. Nothing to write home about, but if you’re an Eagles fan, as I am, you may be interested to know that Don Henley, Glenn Frey, and Timothy B. Schmit provided the backing vocals for this track. That said, the mix fails to amplify this fact and that's an incredible shame as John had three of the world's greatest vocalists backing him up, yet failed to capitalise on their collective musical talents. Perhaps more distressing is this was a Taupin/John collaboration. A missed opportunity? Definitely! Although, the album wouldn’t be the same without White Lady White Powder.

Dear God is another lovely ballad and reminds me somewhat of the sonic qualities John would later explore throughout the late 80s and 90s on songs such as Sacrifice.

Never Gonna Fall In Love Again is sensational from start to finish. It may be a B-side, but that doesn't mean it's substandard. It’s one of the best songs on the album.

Take Me Back is a country-pop song that John performs exceptionally well. It would have fit incredibly well on Tumbleweed Connection, but feels a little out-of-place on 21 At 33.

Give Me The Love is a perfect song to close the album with. The musical introduction is gorgeous and even though John sings with a slight southern (Elvis-inspired) style, it suits the song perfectly and encourages me to listen to the album again and stay within John’s catalogue.

Overall, 21 At 33 is an exceptional album that is severely underrated. Perhaps I just like backing the underdog, but John's catalogue is so full of exceptional music that it would be an impossible task to put a compilation together. Perhaps that is why so many of his career perspective releases feature the fan favourites and chart-topping hits. Regardless, you’d be well advised to further explore John’s back catalogue as the hits are only an introduction to an absolute legend with very few peers. 

While not Mastered for iTunes, the remastered edition on Apple Music is superb and 21 At 33 really comes alive, compelling me to keep an eye out for the CD or a possible vinyl reissue in the not too distant future.

21 At 33 is available on CD and iTunes.

If you prefer streaming, 21 At 33 is also available on Spotify.

Click here to read other Elton John reviews by Subjective Sounds.

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