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Mötley Crüe – Dr. Feelgood (Album Review)

Mötley Crüe – Dr. Feelgood (Album Review)

Without a doubt, Dr. Feelgood is one of the greatest hard rock albums of the 80s. With sales exceeding 6 million units, fans were obviously drawn to it, as I was, roughly three decades ago. As soon as I heard the intro to Dr. Feelgood, I was hooked and a fan for life. While Mötley Crüe can fill numerous greatest hits releases with their extensive back catalogue, Dr. Feelgood is an album that plays like a compilation of the very best the band has to offer and should be in every hard rock collection. It’s arguably perfect! 

The vinyl release I’m fortunate enough to own is the 2008 Eleven Seven Music/Mötley Records reissue (cat: ESM/MR 342). The artwork is reprinted adequately, although there is a mottling effect that appears throughout when looking closely as if the artwork had been scanned for the reissue. It’s not a major issue, but one that collectors may wish to look out for. The inner-sleeve liner notes are presented clearly, for those of us interested in seeing who contributed to Dr. Feelgood from a production standpoint. The lyrics are also reprinted beautifully and while I’m not overly focused on lyrical meaning, it’s great that they’re reprinted here for those of you who are interested in singing along. 

The record label is simple, but that is really all you need. The record itself is flat but my edition is a little noisy in between tracks, with a couple of small dropouts in Slice Of Your Pie. That’s just something that you have to deal with when collecting vinyl, but the noise element isn’t an issue, of course, when the music kicks in. 

Mastering wise, it sounds great. The pressing has a truly analogue feel, even though I believe the album was recorded digitally. The soundstage is massive with a clear separation between all instrumental elements and vocals. If you’re interested in a rock and roll album that highlights each member of the band, then look no further for this is the album for you. For bass fans, you’ll also be pleasantly surprised. Given many of the hard rock/metal albums of the 80s lack a decent low end, Dr. Feelgood makes up for all those that sound too shrill with a drum and bass beat that will send you to heaven as the masterful Mick Mars riffs the hell out of his guitar. Subsequently, if you can track down a copy of this 2008 reissue, I don’t think you’ll be disappointed. I know I’m not. For comparison, albeit it not an ideal example, the Apple Music (non-Mastered for iTunes) release can’t even compare to the vinyl release. It sounds so flat and lifeless that I almost don’t like listening to it, but you can’t easily take vinyl everywhere with you; unless you’re into creating needle drops that is. It’s a time-consuming exercise, but one that purists swear by and yes the analogue-nature of vinyl does transfer to a digital file.  

It is important to note before venturing into the review of the individual songs, that the only editions available on Apple Music are the 20th Anniversary Expanded Edition and a standard 16-track reissue that I have no information about at all. Let’s just say that while the additional songs from the 16-track release may appeal to some fans, I find demos to be trivial additions and given that I feel the original 11-track lineup is approaching, if not reaching, pure perfection, I intend to ignore these additional tracks for this review and am thankful that I can exclude these additional demos when adding Dr. Feelgood to my digital library.  

SIDE ONE

T.n T. (Terror ‘n Tinseltown) is a great starter track. Short, to the point, but opens the album beautifully and is the perfect non-musical introduction for Dr. Feelgood. 

Dr. Feelgood needs no introduction. It is the reason I’m here and likely why you are too. Pump the volume and rock out to the incredibly rhythmic and catchy tune that is one of the very best songs Mötley Crüe has ever recorded.

While I suggested dismissing the additional demos, on the digital releases, Dr. Feelgood is one song that you may wish to take a listen to as the demo is sung from the doctor’s point-of-view. It isn’t great, but it isn’t bad either. It’s intriguing, but I’m glad it never made it to the original tracking of the album. 

The music video is a solid release but is arguably out-of-sync with the musicality and really all I want to see when I watch this music video is the band rocking out. We never really see Mick Mars do his thing properly. A shame considering what a magnificent guitarist he is. Think Slash’s solos in the Guns N’ Roses music videos, well, you aren’t getting that here. Despite that, the music video appealed to the audience of the era. I know it drew me in as I would wait patiently for it to come on TV. 

Slice Of Your Pie slows things down a little but is a great blues-based rock and roll song. Plus, if you’re a Beatles fan you may appreciate the closing elements that pay homage to I Want You (She’s So Heavy); one of my favourite Beatles tracks. Slice Of Your Pie is an all-round excellent song that is so multi-layered it needs to be heard to be believed. 

Rattlesnake Shake is hard and fast with a little rhythm thrown in for good measure; just the way I like it. 

Kickstart My Heart has another killer intro and the moment you hear it, you know exactly what you’re going to get. Perfect? I think so! 

The music video is rather solid and the intermingled adrenaline-based scenes shown while the band is playing is a nice effect but it would be an epileptic’s nightmare. Plus, the opening where the band are arriving for their own gig is simply lame.  

Without You is a beautiful power-ballad. The music video is, however, truly cringeworthy, but so few music videos from that era are timeless.

SIDE TWO

Same Ol’ Situation (S.O.S) is the perfect song to open side two with. What an incredible beat and rhythm. Rock and roll doesn’t get much better than this, does it? 

The music video is essentially a live tribute to the fans. I love it. It’s absolutely perfect and shows Mötley Crüe at arguably their very best, theatrics and all. It’s well edited and if you watch this music video sitting down, you’re watching it wrong. 

Sticky Sweet is a superb song and perfectly suited for Mötley Crüe. It may not be a song you’d write home about, but Dr. Feelgood wouldn’t be the same without it. Although, that ending is a little too sudden, especially if you’re rocking out to the groove. 

She Goes Down is a fun song and is another one that doesn’t let you take a breath as you rock out to this album. That drum and bass intertwining rhythm is off-the-charts. 

Don’t Go Away Mad (Just Go Away) is a great blues-based near-ballad tune with, again, some killer musicality. 

The music video attempts to tell a story but fails miserably in my opinion. It just isn’t good and only gets better when the band reach the rehearsal space and Mars shreds it up as only he can. 

Time For Change is epic and is one of the greatest closers of any rock and roll album in my collection. It absolutely encourages me to listen to the album again and stay within Mötley Crüe’s back catalogue. I don’t know about you, dear reader, but Time For Change would have been a perfect Beatles hit, or even a Lennon masterpiece; it is that good!

Nothing more really needs to be said other than if you don’t already have a copy, in your collection, you should go and pick one up. You won’t regret it, but your neighbours might as this is one album that you’ll want to pump the volume on.

Dr. Feelgood is available on Vinyl, CD, and iTunes (16-Track | 20th Anniversary Expanded Edition). 

Alice Cooper – Constrictor (Album Review)

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Alice Cooper – Constrictor (Album Review)

Alice Cooper is a musical genius and one of my all-time favourite musicians. As such, I have spent the last couple of years tracking down some of his albums that are harder to come by, certainly in Australia; Constrictor being one of them.

While I would become a life-long Cooper fan following Trash, and the mainstream popularity of the album’s lead single Poison, my mother forbade me from having Alice Cooper in the house. At one stage, when I wanted the Trash album, she called it trash and asked why I would want that kind of trash. She thought it was a clever play on words, I thought it was ridiculous! Thankfully as the rebellious teenage years approached, I had a job and was able to start collecting some of the greatest rock and roll music in history. At no time did I consider these albums to be bad influences and quite frankly I was so captivated by the music that I spent every last cent buying records, rather than spending that same money on illicit substances like so many of my peers.

Subsequently, I encourage my children to have the same passion for music as I do. I also encourage them to never buy a 'clean' version of an album as it is not what the artist intended. I teach them about artistic license and encourage them to ask questions and talk about their experiences. That said, I don't let them listen to Steel Panther (yet), but I won't stop playing one of their records when they enter the room as I believe it encourages unhealthy taboos that can affect their lives. I've come to this conclusion based on years of psychological damage that an overprotective mother imposed on me. Thus far, it has worked wonderfully and my children understand and respect that some music is not yet appropriate for their maturity level. However, it is important to note that just because Katy Perry and Taylor Swift may both have a girl-next-door persona, it doesn’t mean that their songs are any less provocative than that of Alice Cooper and his peers. My children also know there is no such thing as trash music as it is all subjective and one's opinion does not need to meet with the approval of another.

With that in mind, join me as I give you my opinion of Alice Cooper's Constrictor. I'd love to read your own subjective opinions, so feel free to use the comments section below.

Teenage Frankenstein has some gorgeous guitar work. The overall rhythm is addictive as is the catchy lyrical delivery. Let the head-bopping, toe-tapping, and out-of-tune karaoke begin.

Give It Up is an excellent rock and roll song with a vocal presentation that I absolutely adore. The musicality is riff driven and every time I listen to Give It Up, I enter musical heaven.

Thrill My Gorilla keeps the album rocking with a rock/pop sound that is most definitely a byproduct of the 80s. I grew up through the 80s, so I love it! That era of music is very groove based and I’m so happy that Rob Zombie has taken this style, made it his own, and continues the groove-infused rock and roll sound.

Life And Death Of The Party is exceptional! It is one of Cooper's greatest songs, yet you will not see it on any of Cooper's compilations or live recordings (except for the 1989 live album Prince of Darkness). Such a shame, as it really is that good!

Simple Disobedience is awesome!

The World Needs Guts is riff and rhythm heaven. I find myself singing along to this song every time it plays. Yes, I also warm up my air guitar and dance around the house. The World Needs Guts is another exceptional Alice Cooper performance. However, the cymbals are a little concealed in the soundstage and I would prefer them to be more present in the mix.

Trick Bag is a good song, but it’s most certainly a B-side.

Crawlin' returns the album to the overall rhythmic feel heard prior to Trick Bag. It isn't the strongest song on the album, but I couldn't imagine Constrictor without it.

The Great American Success Story has a promising start, but turns the rock and roll down from 11 to 7 as it enters the chorus. It isn't a bad song, but the chorus irritates me. It is simply too campy!

He's Back (The Man Behind The Mask) [Theme from the Motion Picture, "Friday the 13th Part VI: Jason Lives") is excellent and a perfect song to close the album with.

I could, and have, listened to Constrictor on repeat for hours on end. While there are a couple of B-sides, I feel Constructor is a very underrated Alice Cooper album and, as such, I hope you will give it a listen as I truly believe it is worth your time.

For this review, I listened to the MCA Records (MCAD-5761) CD. The mastering is a bit of a mixed bag. I like it as it has that warm and fuzzy analogue 80's tape sound, but CD normally has a more clinical tonality. It simply messes with your mind as the analogue and digital streams are being crossed. Personally, I don't mind either tonality, but it is something to note when listening to the album.

From an artwork perspective, I love the cover art. Even with CD-sized graphics, the snake still looks fake! It is frankly comical that way and certainly reminiscent of the Alice Cooper character. What I can't fathom, however, is the use of pink on the rear cover and spine of the CD. I guess all one needs to do is look back at glam rock and professional wrestling in the 80s to remember that pink was the in-colour for hardasses. How fashion and times changed! The liner notes are also printed on an equally questionable yellow, but at least the complete lyrics and production notes are present. It isn’t bothersome, but it just isn't a colour scheme that I have come to expect from Alice Cooper albums. Although, Pretties For You makes me think twice about that statement! Regardless, it is a prized possession in my CD collection and I love it as much for the musicality as I do for the interesting artwork style that beckons me to recall a bygone era of towel hats, short shorts, and long socks, held high with elastic, while wearing sandals. Yes, there are pictures of me from this era, but trust me when I say that nobody needs to see that fashion era again. Nostalgia be damned!

Constrictor is available on CD, the TIDAL Store (16/44.1kHz FLAC), and iTunes. If you prefer streaming, you can check out Alice Cooper's Constrictor on Spotify and Apple Music.

Click here to read other Alice Cooper reviews by Subjective Sounds.

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