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Kylie Minogue – Golden (Deluxe Edition) [Album Review]

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Kylie Minogue – Golden (Deluxe Edition) [Album Review]

Kylie Minogue is Madonnic; by which I mean that Australia’s pop princess and one of the country’s most successful musical exports is continually transcending musical trends while remaining familiar and instantly recognisable. Yes, Madonna, has achieved the same level of diversity and evolution, hence the Madonnic association. Nevertheless, Golden sees Minogue adopt a country-pop style that is arguably different from her previous works but works surprisingly well. 

When Golden was released, I took a listen and was captivated enough to add it to my Apple Music library. Revisiting it now, essentially a year later, I want to know if Golden is good enough to add to my physical collection, keep within my digital collection, or remove completely from my music collection with the only recollection of the album being this very review. Between you and I, dear reader, it most certainly isn’t the latter. 

If you’re thinking there is only one edition of Golden, you’d be mistaken. Apple Music may currently only have the Deluxe Edition, but Golden is yet another modern release that has seen too many editions, on too many formats, released too close to each other. There is no doubt that some fans will rejoice with the variety, and it is important to note that my criticism of the multiple editions has nothing to do with the quality of music, but it is frustrating that all bonus tracks don’t make it to the Deluxe Edition. Seriously, shouldn’t a Deluxe Edition contain everything? Clearly, the Deluxe Edition isn’t as deluxe as the record label would like us to believe for the Japanese release includes two additional remixes of Dancing. A streaming edition (not available on Apple Music) features a remix of Stop Me From Falling that features Gente de Zona, while the Collector’s Edition cassette provides a bonus downloadable track, New York City (Live From New York). If that doesn’t cause you enough confusion to run for the hills, a Christmas Collector’s Edition cassette includes the single edition of Music’s Too Sad Without You. Plus, the Christmas Collector’s Edition cassette includes an exclusive Christmas video message from Minogue. 

Okay, so perhaps additional remixes and live tracks aren’t that impressive and rightly should have been left off the Deluxe Edition as I, myself, have often criticised the inclusion of bonus tracks that add little to no value to the listener. That said, it is still my belief that the Deluxe Edition should contain all additional tracks while a standard edition should be readily available for fans who are just interested in what can be assumed to be the very best selection from the Golden recording sessions.

Oh, by the way, in case you were wondering, yes, Golden was also released on vinyl and the cover art on the larger canvas looks incredible; although that format has also seen a variety of options that will send fans broke if they are to try and acquire each and every edition. Golden is not alone in this regard. Many modern releases are designed to part the true fans with their hard-earned money (a phrase I detest, but one that seems appropriate). It’s really disappointing for fans who want to support their beloved artists but need to purchase the album multiple times in order to do so. Yes, I acknowledge that artists, and the record labels, are in the business to make money, but that doesn’t make it right. Certainly, no-one is holding a gun to your head demanding you purchase it, but true completist fans know only too well the desire of collecting. It would be the same as holding an AA meeting in a beer garden and expecting all in attendance to order a lemon squash. Kind of ridiculous, isn’t it? 

Of course, I’m not suggesting that multiple releases should be outlawed, but to release so many editions, so close after the album’s initial release, is what strikes me as opportunistic. Anniversary editions, fine. A simple release schedule of the standard edition available on all formats with a Deluxe Edition (including everything) for the hardcore fans, fine. But the way Golden has been released suggests that for fans to get everything, they need to almost buy one of everything. I guess I just wish that a Deluxe Edition was the defining element for an album’s release and that while exclusives to streaming services have been largely criticised and expunged from said services, the same should apply for physical media thereby allowing the music-lover to purchase the album on the format that they prefer without needing to purchase multiple copies to get questionable bonuses. 

All that said, it’s ultimately the music that matters most. Join me as we take a look at the songs that make up Golden (Deluxe Edition).

Dancing is an incredible song and sets the tone for the entire album. Dancing, is certainly catchy, not far removed from Minogue’s renowned disco-sound, yet with a country vibe that deals with the somewhat sensitive topic of death in a brilliant way that I thoroughly enjoy because I too want to go out dancing!

The music video is excellent and will irritate those who dislike line dancing. Nevertheless, it is well done and mixes perfectly Minogue’s new and old styles while also ensuring the video is familiar to the album artwork that was to come a few months after the single’s initial release. It is, for lack of a better term, the complete package and one of the best modern music videos I’ve seen in a long time. 

Stop Me From Falling flows beautifully from dancing and what better than to contrast the proposition of death with that of falling in love. It’s another stellar song with a very interesting treble-inspired musical approach that works remarkably well. It’s a joy to listen to and I don’t know about you, dear reader, but the rhythm is spot on and I dare you to sit still while Stop Me From Falling is playing. 

The core music video for Stop Me From Falling is a little less story-driven than that for Dancing, but the interlinking of a live performance, behind the scenes elements, and Minogue singing and dancing in solo elements is perfectly edited and is one of those cases where after seeing the music video, the song itself is more profound and even better than when listening to it in the album format.

There is a secondary music video that was shot as well, which is more story driven but is cringeworthy. Even the remix chosen for the song doesn’t appeal to me and I’m glad it wasn’t the edition that appeared on the album. 

Golden has a slightly slower rhythm than the previous tracks, but it’s a lovely song and one that is thoroughly enjoyable to listen to. That said, I feel Minogue’s vocal could have been stronger throughout. It isn’t so much the mix as I feel she just didn’t knock it out of the park on this track. 

The Golden music video is relatively basic and while this simplicity is rather common as you proceed to, and pass, the third single, the quality often begins to suffer as the record labels don’t really care about putting too much money into promotion after an initial boost. A shame, but at least it isn’t cringeworthy. It is, however, easily forgotten and you’re unlikely to watch it again unless your preferred way to consume music is via music videos.  

A Lifetime To Repair is really pushing the auto-tune/vocal manipulation a little too far for my liking. I know it is the predominant style of the modern pop era, but I feel there are times when it is overused and I feel that becomes apparent throughout this song. It’s still a great tune though and the musicality and soundstage is magnificent. Seriously, listen to A Lifetime To Repair a couple of times and you’ll immediately notice sonic elements that you had missed the previous time around. This is one song where repeat listens really enhances the experience and that fiddle during the chorus is epic; if only it were more prominent in the mix. 

Sincerely Yours is magnificent. A beautiful song from start to finish!

One Last Kiss is a good song, but arguably the first B-side on the album. I’m not convinced that the nasal approach of Minogue’s vocal suits the song. Yes, it works, but it is this element that makes One Last Kiss a B-Side for me. 

Live A Little is addictively good. I love it!

Shelby ‘68 has an exceptional vocal presentation. I love the styling and the beat, and while slow, is absolutely magnificent. This is one of the best songs on the album and I’d argue it’s one of the best songs Minogue has ever recorded. 

Radio On really brings Minogue’s vocal front and centre. It’s a lovely mix and good to hear her voice so clearly as many of the songs that she is known for are musically dense and we rarely get to hear just how beautiful her voice is, other than in a near-acoustic song, such as this, that is a lovely addition to the album. 

Love isn’t a bad song, a little short for my liking, but it works really well within the album format and Golden wouldn’t be the same without it. 

Raining Glitter is a fun song that is thoroughly enjoyable to listen to but it’s nothing to write home about and doesn’t push the boundaries of what Minogue is capable of. 

Music’s Too Sad Without You (with Jack Savoretti) is the song that closes out the core 12-track standard edition and vinyl releases of the album. It is a perfect closer. However, the additional four tracks on the Deluxe Edition are excellent and therefore I’d strongly recommend you listen to the Deluxe Edition. That said, Music’s Too Sad Without You is a beautiful song and Jack Savoretti fits in perfectly with Minogue’s style. It’s a great duet-styled song and one of the highlights on Golden.

The music video for Music’s Too Sad Without You is exceptionally good. It’s beautifully filmed and edited with only the bare necessities in place. Although, as perfect as it is, the fade out towards the end of the song begins too abruptly for my liking. Nevertheless, it is one blemish on an otherwise perfect production. 

A live duet of Music’s Too Sad Without You was also recorded and released on Savorett’s Singing To Strangers. It isn’t a bad live recording, the musical elements are recorded extremely well, but the vocals, especially Minogue’s, are lacking in strength within the mix and subsequently sound distant. A shame considering just how good this song is. 

Lost Without You is a great song and while I acknowledge it is a little jolting from the smooth and magnificent Music’s Too Sad Without You, it’s a stellar addition to the Deluxe Edition and once the chorus begins, the mind has adjusted to the sonic shift and all is well. 

Every Little Part Of Me is a great dance meets country meets pop song, but it does challenge the mind a little; not that that is a bad thing!

Rollin’ isn’t Limp Bizkit’s Rollin’, but it is perfect for Minogue and is a value-added proposition for fans. 

Low Blow is Lady Gaga meets Kylie Minogue. It isn’t bad, it’s actually really good, but the various stylings are intriguing and while it may not appeal to everyone, I certainly like it. The soundstage and musicality is off-the-charts good and it does what all good closing songs should, it encourages me to listen to the album again and stay within Minogue’s extensive catalogue. It’s also a song that will induce an earworm for hours and days afterwards. 

Overall, Golden (Deluxe Edition) is an exceptional release that will ultimately appeal to longtime Minogue fans as well as newcomers who appreciate the country-pop style. As an irregular Minogue fan, ever since Locomotion set the charts on fire, I have to say that I thoroughly enjoy Golden and plan to pick it up on vinyl as the more I listen to it, the more I become captivated by it. Of course, the problem is deciding which one to get. There is the Limited Edition 180gm Clear Vinyl release, the Limited Edition Super Deluxe Edition (featuring the record, a hardcover book, and the CD – I’ve seen it in person and it looks amazing!). Plus, there is also the standard black vinyl gatefold release and a picture disc edition. Seriously, there are too many versions, aren’t there? Nevertheless, I think I’ve settled on the Super Deluxe Edition as it offers a good balance of everything Golden presents. 

Ultimately, Golden is a fantastic modern country-pop album that is only let down by too many varied editions. 

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