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Metallica – ...And Justice For All (Album Review)

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Metallica – ...And Justice For All (Album Review)

Metallica's ...And Justice For All has been marred with controversy since its release in 1988. While I wouldn’t experience the album until I became captivated by Metallica, following their self-titled (black album) and Load-era releases, I found an instant liking for the raw production of …And Justice For All

Yes, there are those who dislike the album, often due to the minuscule bass element with the new bassist, at the time, Jason Newsted following Cliff Burton's death. However, while I acknowledge the bass is lacking, I look at the album from a different perspective whereby one could suggest the lack of bass emphasis was a fitting tribute to Burton. Subsequently, I don't subscribe to the ...And Justice For Jason memes. While anything is possible, and the release of a super deluxe edition box set may yet reveal the lost bass tracking, I’ll also be content if it is never released. In some way, I feel it wouldn't be the same album. There is an undeniable sonic signature to the album, similar to the rawness of St. Anger, that I admire. Change the mix and you risk changing the magic that is ...And Justice For All.

For this review, I have been listening to the 2014 Blackened Recordings Reissue (BLCKND007-1).

As you would expect, Stephen Gorman's artwork is exquisite on the larger canvas. Although, the green lettering hasn't aged well in my opinion. It always reminds me of Mötley Crüe’s Dr Feelgood cover art as the green tonality is so similar.

While I’d love to say the artwork has been faithfully reproduced, the liner notes in this pressing are available as an extra slip-in sheet, versus being used as vinyl inner sleeves. Instead, we get the most god-awful rice paper sleeves that scuff the vinyl. Seriously, I know these sleeves are cheap to produce, but if you release a premium product, commanding a premium price, you would be best advised to invest a little more in the manufacturing. Perhaps most disappointing is that this is released on the artists' own record label. Metallica has full control over Blackened Recordings, so this cheapness amazes me and is an insult to fans.

Another change that defies explanation is the removal of the album artwork from the centre of the records. We now get a black background with green text. While it doesn't look bad, it doesn't look nearly as good as early pressings in my opinion. Nevertheless, it is all about the music, so let’s check it out.

Side One

Blackened in symphonic metal heaven, as much of Metallica's music is. It’s heavy, raw, and distorted to hell and back, but turn that volume to 11 as it’s really the best way to enjoy this exceptional album starter.

...And Justice For All has a gorgeous acoustic introduction before the metal elements take control. Such a wonderful composition. Despite its length, l’ve never felt the song is self-indulgent and every note is thoroughly appreciated. Plus, that Hammett guitar solo is what air guitar dreams are made of.

Side Two

Eye Of The Beholder has a slow burn to begin with but once the volume hits its peak, and that riff kicks in, it's fantastic. Well, that is until Hetfield starts singing. I’ve always had a love/hate relationship with the vocal presentation on this song and its overly processed nature. That said, the rhythmic chorus is thoroughly addictive and it’s the perfect attitude-fuelled song to listen to when you're pissed off!

One is exceptional!

Side Three

The Shortest Straw is the perfect song, with the perfect tempo, to follow on from One. It’s head-banging gold. You have to love that chorus, one of Hetfield’s best in my opinion.

Harvester Of Sorrow has a killer rhythm, but I have always felt the introduction for the song is just too long. As the first single off the album, it was an interesting choice, especially considering the intro wasn't edited. While I love this song, it simply isn’t single material in my opinion.

The Frayed Ends Of Sanity is demonic. I love it!

Side Four

To Live Is To Die, again, has that gorgeous acoustic element to it. Part of me just wants it to continue every time I listen to the song, but as a fan of Metallica's epic instrumental tracks, I know only too well that they must come to an end. If it wasn’t vinyl, I’d probably put it on repeat. Of course, that isn’t what the artist had in mind when compiling the album.

Dyers Eve is my song. I live for it. It identifies me. It may not be the strongest song on the album, but just as it is a homage to Hetfield's parents, so too is it to mine. There is literally no other song, by any artist, in any genre, that I identify with more. Dyers Eve is textbook thrash metal and while I may have a biased viewpoint, I think it’s fair to declare this as one of Metallica’s best songs and one of their last true thrash masterpieces.

Overall, there isn't a bad song to be found on ...And Justice For All. If you can get past the bass controversy, you're going to find an album that is arguably more riff-driven than any other in history.

Sonically, I would class the vinyl record as adequate. I actually prefer the mastering of the album found on TIDAL Hi-Fi. That doesn't happen often, but despite having a solid soundstage and excellent uncompressed dynamic range, it just isn't as powerful as the digital master. Perhaps my liking for the digital master is due to originally owning the album on CD. Or, perhaps, this vinyl release is just a poor pressing. Regardless, the viewpoint of which edition or format is better is truly subjective. That said, I am looking forward to an upcoming remaster.

...And Justice For All is available on Vinyl, CD, the TIDAL Store (16/44.1kHz FLAC) and iTunes (Mastered for iTunes).

If you prefer streaming, ...And Justice For All is also available on TIDAL Hi-Fi, Spotify, and Apple Music.

Click here to read other Metallica reviews by Subjective Sounds.

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AC/DC – '74 Jailbreak (EP Review)

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AC/DC – '74 Jailbreak (EP Review)

Few EP releases are as strong as AC/DC's '74 Jailbreak. In many respects, one could call this release a mini-greatest hits had it not been for the fact that the included songs were largely unavailable to music lovers outside of Australia. Released in 1984, US audiences were able, for the first time, to easily hear five exceptional tracks that were never released in their region during the 70s. While it is difficult to comprehend the fan's joy upon first hearing this release, one only has to spin the record and turn up the volume to hear just how polished AC/DC was in those early years.

Without a B-side to be found, '74 Jailbreak is one of the greatest AC/DC releases and should be in every fan's collection. Yes, the EP is short but that isn't necessarily a bad thing, especially if you have a copy on CD or are listening to the EP via a streaming service. For me, I have the 2003, remastered by George Marino at Sterling Sound, vinyl record. Talk about perfect, vinyl rarely sounds better than this, although I don't feel that way about all the AC/DC reissues from 2003, especially Back In Black with its inner-grove distortion. While '74 Jailbreak could have been mastered to 45-rpm, the 33.3-rpm pressing has an incredible soundstage with a perfect mix that ensures the bass and drum beats remain prominent, but never overpowering. Similarly, Scott's vocals have never sounded better and each high-hat tap is crystal clear. The vinyl edition is so well mastered and pressed that I feel no need to even compare it to the TIDAL Hi-Fi CD-quality edition. Yes, dear reader, this is where needle dropping to local digital files comes into play.

The artwork, in the full 12-inch format, is glorious and the inner sleeves, from these 2003 reissues, show just how much time and care was taken with the reissues. Many musicians and record labels could learn a thing or two about re-issuing albums on vinyl if they checked out the quality of the AC/DC pressings; excluding of course Back In Black. They are prized possessions!

Side One  

Jailbreak was released initially on the 1976 album Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap and was also released as a single, with a reissue of the single arriving in 1980. While Jailbreak may not be the first song fans gravitate towards, it has been featured in AC/DC’s live performances for decades. The 1985 Dallas live recording, featured on Backtracks, is solid but doesn't have the power of the original. Normally, I prefer Johnson over Scott, but not in this case. The drawn-out 13-minute plus performance does hold the listener’s attention, but at times it can feel a little too self-indulgent. Similarly, the 1992 live performance, as heard on Live (Collector's Edition) suffers the same fate. Nevertheless, I feel this latter performance is more polished with Johnson's vocal delivery being stronger. Still, there is no escaping the fact that the original studio recording cannot be topped. Of course, that all depends on how much you love music videos. Featured on AC/DC's Family Jewels DVD collection, the clip is less cringe-worthy than other music videos of the same era, but Scott barely moves and appears to be singing this rock and roll tune in a polite college boy manner. It’s interesting, to say the least. Nevertheless, I'm glad it exists for posterity value if nothing else. Bottom line: Jailbreak is an exceptional song and a great start to '74 Jailbreak.

You Ain't Got A Hold On Me has an incredible rhythm. Although, I’ve always thought that Scott's vocal sounds particularly thin and forward on this song. Interestingly, you may notice when listening to Johnson-era recordings, by comparison, his vocals were always mixed in a more central position in relation to the music, whereas Scott’s always stood out in the mix. It is a minor difference, but noticeable.

Show Business is blues rock 101. I love it! The 1975 live recording, as featured on Family Jewels, is a solid performance but I have to wonder if Scott borrowed his outfit from Elton John.

Side Two 

Soul Stripper is a layered and complex wonderland. The soundstage is massive. The entrance, while lengthy, never gets dull and Scott's vocal entry and presence in the song is nothing short of perfection.

Baby, Please Don't Go is a cover, and a bloody good one at that. To say the song has been covered extensively is an understatement, but I’ve yet to hear, or see, anyone perform this song as well as AC/DC. Seriously, get your Family Jewels DVD out again and check out the larrikin-based performance on Australia's popular music show, Countdown, in April 1975. It’s hilarious and Scott would have easily made a name for himself on the streets of Sydney's Kings Cross with that outfit. It’s certainly an interesting contrast to Angus' schoolboy outfit and it’s funny to see Scott light a cigarette during the performance. That would never be allowed today and who knows maybe the Pippi Longstockings outfit would now also be condemned for fear of offending someone. Regardless, the performance shows just how much AC/DC was enjoying themselves. Their energy and smiles are addictive.

From start to finish, '74 Jailbreak is an exceptional collection of blues-based rock and roll songs that will never age and will remain part of the social consciousness for generators to come.

'74 Jailbreak is available on Vinyl, CD, the TIDAL Store (16/44.1kHz FLAC) and iTunes (Mastered for iTunes). The iTunes edition is also presented in the iTunes LP format for Mac or PC users.

If you prefer streaming, '74 Jailbreak is also available on TIDAL Hi-Fi, Spotify, and Apple Music.

Click here to read other AC/DC reviews by Subjective Sounds.

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Meat Loaf – Bat Out Of Hell (Album Review)

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Meat Loaf – Bat Out Of Hell (Album Review)

Bat Out Of Hell is an absolute classic and while there are few that would dismiss its importance to the history of recorded music, most of us would agree that it is a landmark album. It's a shame then that the sonic quality has never really lived up to the hype, but more on that later.

In 1993, Meat Loaf had once again exploded on the world's stage with Bat Out Of Hell II: Back Into Hell and the monumentally popular lead single I'd Do Anything For Love (But I Won’t Do That). Both would herald my first experiences of Meat Loaf and I was immediately hooked. So much so that the acquisition of the album that started it all was all but guaranteed.

As I played the Bat Out Of Hell cassette, I remember being surprised that an album would have fewer than ten songs. You must remember that this was at the height the CD era when artists and record labels had a tendency to fill the capacity of the CD for no other reason than because they could. Sure, there were some exceptional albums that went for the 74-minute duration, but they were often the exception, rather than the rule. Despite this, I quickly learnt that the song limitations on Bat Out Of Hell were due to the approximate 44-minute runtime of the vinyl LP and the fact that Meat Loaf often defied the radio-friendly runtime. 

Sadly, the cassette no longer exists in my collection. It became a casualty of the MP3 era. Yes, dear reader, I was a bloody idiot! The most unfortunate aspect of this move to digital convenience was that I’ve never been able to find a comparable copy, on any format. While I acknowledge the placebo effect in relation to my memories of how the cassette sounded, I have found that many of the currently available editions lack midrange with excessive treble. It is frustrating and reminds me of my beloved ABBA collection. Some releases are excellent, most are substandard, usually due to varied masters and master tape quality.

A few years ago, I decided to pick up a vinyl release as much for the artwork as the promised return to analog sound. Well, let's just say the CD-quality edition on TIDAL Hi-Fi is significantly better. That's putting it mildly as Lucifer himself wouldn't allow the Simply Vinyl pressing to enter hell. It truly is that bad!

The catalogue number for the aforementioned atrocity is SVLP 0086/82419. Simply Vinyl even had the audacity to claim that it was pressed on Virgin Vinyl, a fact that is a completely inaccurate as the surface noise alone is off the charts. Even recycled vinyl can sound adequate if the record has been mastered and pressed with respect to the limitations of the medium and the original recording. Besides the poor sonic quality, the Simply Vinyl release is pressed so poorly that the lead song, Bat Out Of Hell, starts about a second later than it should.

I could go on and on about how pathetic the pressing is and how much extraneous treble is present. I could also detail how the record lacks soul, drive, and emphasis, not to mention musicality, but I think you get the idea. Simply avoid this pressing at all costs.

As a result, I won’t be using the Simply Vinyl release for this review as it would tarnish my thoughts on the songs themselves. I will subsequently be using the TIDAL Hi-Fi edition as the basis for this review. It still isn’t what I would consider as perfect, but it offers a decent quality that allows me to enjoy Bat Out Of Hell.

Bat Out Of Hell is a killer track to commence the album with. It is the epitome pop/rock opera, along with Paradise By The Dashboard Light of course, and I simply adore it.

You Took The Words Right Out Of My Mouth (Hot Summer Night) has the classic Jim Steinman spoken intro that works well with the song, but I find the musicality in this track to be too campy and rather dated. That is not to say that I dislike it, but this song could have easily come from Abba's catalogue, especially with the backing vocal style. Regardless, once the song gets going, I find it captivating and feel the need to sing-a-long.

Heaven Can Wait is simply gorgeous!

All Revved Up With No Place To Go is a little too jazzy for my liking. Despite that, I don’t dislike the song and will once again belt out every chorus and verse. 

Two Out Of Three Ain't Bad is pure Meat Loaf. Just like Heaven Can Wait, I thoroughly enjoy songs that highlight Meat Loaf's vocal presentation. While he’s been criticised in recent years for poor live performances, there is no shame on this track. He knocked it out of the park with Two Out Of Three Ain’t Bad; one of my all-time favourites.

Paradise By The Dashboard Light has a reputation that needs no introduction, Pure perfection from a songwriting and musical perspective. It's a shame it lacks midrange while also needing a little boost in the low end. Regardless, it would be in my Top 100 songs of all-time, if I had such a list.

For Crying Out Loud is another of those exceptional vocal-driven tunes that are perfect for Meat Loaf. While we all likely gravitate to the well-known, face-paced, rock tunes on the album, I personally adore this song and the gradual build-up is pure gold. Just as Bat Out Of Hell was the perfect song to begin the album with, For Crying Out Loud is the ultimate closer, encouraging me to listen to the album again and stay within Meat Loaf's catalogue for the rest of the day.

Bat Out Of Hell is one of the greatest albums ever recorded; even if not from a sonic standpoint. While Meat Loaf gets most of the credit, Jim Steinman needs to be remembered as the silent but extremely talented writer that was as important to Meat Loaf’s success as Bernie Taupin was to Elton John. Yes, both Meat Loaf and Elton John have worked with other songwriters, but it could be argued that their best work occurred when working with these key contributors.

Without doubt, I need to source a better original for my physical music collection. I have been considering the Analogue Spark SACD release as it is reported to be very good and amongst the best masterings of the album. However, as I was finalising this review, I noticed that Friday Music has just re-issued the album as a 40th Anniversary Edition on red vinyl. Yes, I’m sceptical of another vinyl edition as well. However, it is important to note that this edition has been mastered by Joe Reagoso and Kevin Gray at RTI. Those names alone are akin to royalty in audiophile circles and based on my prior experience with Friday Music pressings, I’m almost tempted to order a copy.

Do you have a preferred edition of this classic? If so, please let us know in the comments. 

Bat Out Of Hell is available on Vinyl, SACD, CD, the TIDAL Store (16/44.1 kHz FLAC), and iTunes (Mastered for iTunes).

If you prefer streaming, Bat Out Of Hell is also available on Spotify and Apple Music.

Click here to read other Meat Loaf reviews by Subjective Sounds.

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Deep Purple - 30: Very Best Of (Compilation Review)

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Deep Purple - 30: Very Best Of (Compilation Review)

30: Very Best Of Deep Purple was my first foray into the musical world of Deep Purple. While I can’t remember the compelling reason for picking up the compilation, I dare say it may have been due to hearing Child In Time in the film Twister. Mediocre scene, superb song!

As many of you would be aware, music can be a great conversation starter and this album has certainly had that desired effect as many individuals, some whom I assumed would never listen to Deep Purple, professed their love for these timeless classics.

I have always used music in the workplace and this album was no exception. Music has the power to break down the employer/employee relationship and while it never garners considerable benefits, it does help dilute tension. Seriously, when the CEO starts strumming the air guitar, you have connected with the human behind the façade. While all workplaces aren’t always accommodating, or for various factors can’t permit the playback of music, I truly believe music introduces a more relaxed atmosphere that encourages productivity.

Hush (1998 Remastered Version) was an excellent choice to commence the compilation on. From the howl to the rhythmic instrumental introduction, to the vocal dexterity; the entire song is simply awesome!

Black Night (1995 Remastered Version) has a killer guitar riff and beat that will have you moving uncontrollably. Seriously, that guitar work is exquisite and pushes the distortion right to edge, but never results in a sub-standard sonic presentation.

Speed King (Dutch Single - Piano Version) is a Killer song and the piano elements certainly add depth to the song. This song is one of the reasons why Deep Purple is one of the greatest rock bands in music history.

Child In Time (Single Edit) is a sonic masterpiece. Yes, Smoke On The Water is coming up, but Child In Time smokes any other song in Deep Purple's catalogue.

Strange Kind Of Woman has a great groove with an addictive vocal. Sometimes, that is all a good song needs.

Fireball is perhaps the only Deep Purple song, on this compilation, that I don't have much love for. I've simply never been able to connect with the song.

Demon's Eye has a great groove and is musicality pleasing. I really appreciate the slower pace of this song and the tempo works well for the style of music we recognise as Deep Purple‘s signature sound.

Smoke On The Water (1997 Remastered Version) really needs no discussion as that guitar riff says it all. Exceptional!

Highway Star (1997 Remix) is the complete package and while the soundstage is somewhat concealed, it rocks?

When A Blind Man Cries (1997 Remix) is an absolutely amazing composition. Music doesn't get much better than this.

Never Before is a solid rock song, but nothing to write home about.

Woman From Tokyo (Single Edit) is another example of musical perfection. While not an overly complex composition, it ticks all the right boxes.

Burn (2004 Remastered Version) is a great song, but the chaotic intermingling of vocal and instrumental aspects, especially in the verse, can become fatiguing.

Stormbringer (2009 Remastered Version) has a killer groove. I love it!

You Keep On Moving is strangely the final track on the TIDAL Hi-Fi edition of the compilation as the 1998 CD featured three additional tracts, including Perfect Strangers, Vavoom: Ted The Mechanic, and Any Fule Kno That. It is a complete mystery as to why these songs are omitted, especially considering I don’t feel You Keep On Moving is a solid enough song to close the compilation with. The aforementioned songs are truly missed and I wish I had never sold the CD during my idiotic MP3 rules era.

It is interesting, however, that these songs are available on iTunes, should you purchase the entire compilation. On Apple Music, however, the songs are greyed out. Yet, they are included on Spotify (thanks to their compile from any album feature). Basically, it is a bloody mess! The only saving grace for me is that iTunes Match streams all the songs as they were, on the original CD, when I ripped it into iTunes as a series of MP3 files.

Hence, just for you dear readers, I will review these three additional songs. 

Perfect Strangers is one of the greatest rock and roll songs to have ever been recorded. Turn the volume to 11 and enjoy as the musicality is off the charts!

Ted The Mechanic (sic) has a unique style that won’t appeal to everyone and I tend to have a love/hate relationship with it. Depending on the mastering, the song can sound rather shrill, but following the introduction the soundstage expands, becoming a more complete Deep Purple song that I really dig. Regardless, it was always a welcome addition to this collection. 

Any Fule Know That is superb. What an incredible beat! As the former final song on the compilation, it always encouraged me to listen to the album again and stay within the Deep Purple catalogue. Truth be told, I’d often put this song on repeat as it is simply that good!

What is disappointing is how this compilation has been handled over the years. Originally released in 1998, there is no reason why streaming services should have a version that includes remasters from 2004 and 2009.

Is nothing sacred anymore?

Trust me when I say that the original CD was mastered beautifully. I don't know about you, but this constant meddling really irritates me.

Memo to all record labels and musicians: If the original is substandard, don't release it. If you do release it, leave it alone. We don't want your remasters.

This, of course, isn't the first time I have been irritated by different editions and masterings of Deep Purple records. See Deep Purple - Made In Japan (Thoughts On The Many Editions).

Despite the questionable antics, surrounding the various masterings, this compilation is still one of the greatest in the history of recorded music. The cover artwork is exceptional and I'll never forget the starkness of that space purple CD.

From a sonic perspective, you can certainly hear variances between the tracks. While the remastered songs don’t help the situation, it is also plausible that this is simply a result of songs being recorded at different studios and at different stages in Deep Purple’s career. That said, at no time does this distract from the enjoyment of the compilation. It really is the very best of Deep Purple!

Deep Purple - 30: Very Best Of is available on CD and iTunes. There is also an extended Special Collectors Edition available on iTunes, albeit with a completely different tracking.

If you prefer streaming, the compilation is also available on Spotify (Standard Edition/Special Collectors Edition) and Apple Music (Standard Edition/Special Collectors Edition).

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Deep Purple - Shades Of Deep Purple (Album Review)

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Deep Purple - Shades Of Deep Purple (Album Review)

From the first seconds of And The Address, the iconic, signature, sound of Deep Purple is present, despite Shades Of Deep Purple being the band’s debut album. And The Address may have an annoying cowbell beat throughout, but looking past that one can see a band already at ease with their musical style. I, for one, become thoroughly engrossed with the groove of this song. What an introduction!

Hush is a howling good song and has always been a favourite of mine. I dare you to sit still while enjoying this classic. It is addictive and one of their greatest recordings.

One More Rainy Day doesn’t have one of the most compelling openings. Yes, the thunderstorm effect is a nice addition, but the most distracting element is the first verse. It really sounds out of place with the musicality, but all is not lost as the song develops nicely. It is a B-side, but worthy of inclusion on the album.

Prelude: Happiness/I'm So Glad really shows off the organ talents of Jon Lord. That man could perform an exceptional solo, on the organ, that would rival any guitar solo in music history. Absolutely incredible! Overall, the song is extremely pleasing and while lyrical elements may become a little repetitive, the song is never fatiguing. In many respects, it amazes me that Prelude: Happiness/I'm So Glad is not included on the numerous Deep Purple compilations and live performances. Surely it is popular amongst fans. Prelude: Happiness/I'm So Glad is severely underrated and I implore you to give it a chance. It is that good!

Mandrake Root fits adequately into the tracking of the album, but it is a B-side and offers nothing really compelling. That said, the lower register of the organ is a nice addition and overall, the musicality works. The major failing, in my opinion, is a weak vocal presentation.

Help is simply exceptional! This cover version is significantly better than the original Beatles recording in my opinion.

Love Help Me isn't the greatest song and feels somewhat detached from the other recordings. There are some truly enjoyable elements, but overall I feel the song sounds too shrill and incomplete.

Hey Joe is a great example of the progressive/psychedelic style of Deep Purple. It is a solid tune that encourages me to listen to the album again and stay within the Deep Purple catalogue.

For this review, I listened to the TIDAL Masters/MQA (24/96 kHz) Stereo Mix. To say it was exceptional would be an understatement. Due to their musical style and remastering with loudness in mind, many Deep Purple recordings have previously been overly shrill. That isn't the case here as MQA has given us a beautiful reproduction that is as close to the master recording as consumers are ever likely to get.

I also listened to the Mono Mix (also TIDAL Masters/MQA [24/96 kHz]) of the album but it didn't appeal to me. Perhaps I'm just used to stereo recordings, but the mono soundstage is just so shallow in comparison to the stereo mix. In a classic what came first, the chicken or the egg? No answer in the mono vs. stereo argument will be agreed upon unanimously. Hence, I will simply say they sound different and I prefer the stereo mix. Truthfully, I'm just glad that we have both mixes available, in MQA, as the listener can select their preferred edition.

Overall, there really isn't a bad thing to say about Shades Of Deep Purple. As far as debuts go, it is one of the better ones in rock and roll and you can clearly hear the origins of what the band would become in the years and decades following this 1968 release.

Shades Of Deep Purple is available on Vinyl, CD, the TIDAL Store (Stereo 16/44.1 kHz FLAC) and (Mono 16/44.1 kHz FLAC), and iTunes (Stereo) and (Mono) (both Mastered For iTunes).

If you prefer streaming, Shades Of Deep Purple is also available on Apple Music (Stereo) and (Mono).

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Alice Cooper – Constrictor (Album Review)

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Alice Cooper – Constrictor (Album Review)

Alice Cooper is a musical genius and one of my all-time favourite musicians. As such, I have spent the last couple of years tracking down some of his albums that are harder to come by, certainly in Australia; Constrictor being one of them.

While I would become a life-long Cooper fan following Trash, and the mainstream popularity of the album’s lead single Poison, my mother forbade me from having Alice Cooper in the house. At one stage, when I wanted the Trash album, she called it trash and asked why I would want that kind of trash. She thought it was a clever play on words, I thought it was ridiculous! Thankfully as the rebellious teenage years approached, I had a job and was able to start collecting some of the greatest rock and roll music in history. At no time did I consider these albums to be bad influences and quite frankly I was so captivated by the music that I spent every last cent buying records, rather than spending that same money on illicit substances like so many of my peers.

Subsequently, I encourage my children to have the same passion for music as I do. I also encourage them to never buy a 'clean' version of an album as it is not what the artist intended. I teach them about artistic license and encourage them to ask questions and talk about their experiences. That said, I don't let them listen to Steel Panther (yet), but I won't stop playing one of their records when they enter the room as I believe it encourages unhealthy taboos that can affect their lives. I've come to this conclusion based on years of psychological damage that an overprotective mother imposed on me. Thus far, it has worked wonderfully and my children understand and respect that some music is not yet appropriate for their maturity level. However, it is important to note that just because Katy Perry and Taylor Swift may both have a girl-next-door persona, it doesn’t mean that their songs are any less provocative than that of Alice Cooper and his peers. My children also know there is no such thing as trash music as it is all subjective and one's opinion does not need to meet with the approval of another.

With that in mind, join me as I give you my opinion of Alice Cooper's Constrictor. I'd love to read your own subjective opinions, so feel free to use the comments section below.

Teenage Frankenstein has some gorgeous guitar work. The overall rhythm is addictive as is the catchy lyrical delivery. Let the head-bopping, toe-tapping, and out-of-tune karaoke begin.

Give It Up is an excellent rock and roll song with a vocal presentation that I absolutely adore. The musicality is riff driven and every time I listen to Give It Up, I enter musical heaven.

Thrill My Gorilla keeps the album rocking with a rock/pop sound that is most definitely a byproduct of the 80s. I grew up through the 80s, so I love it! That era of music is very groove based and I’m so happy that Rob Zombie has taken this style, made it his own, and continues the groove-infused rock and roll sound.

Life And Death Of The Party is exceptional! It is one of Cooper's greatest songs, yet you will not see it on any of Cooper's compilations or live recordings (except for the 1989 live album Prince of Darkness). Such a shame, as it really is that good!

Simple Disobedience is awesome!

The World Needs Guts is riff and rhythm heaven. I find myself singing along to this song every time it plays. Yes, I also warm up my air guitar and dance around the house. The World Needs Guts is another exceptional Alice Cooper performance. However, the cymbals are a little concealed in the soundstage and I would prefer them to be more present in the mix.

Trick Bag is a good song, but it’s most certainly a B-side.

Crawlin' returns the album to the overall rhythmic feel heard prior to Trick Bag. It isn't the strongest song on the album, but I couldn't imagine Constrictor without it.

The Great American Success Story has a promising start, but turns the rock and roll down from 11 to 7 as it enters the chorus. It isn't a bad song, but the chorus irritates me. It is simply too campy!

He's Back (The Man Behind The Mask) [Theme from the Motion Picture, "Friday the 13th Part VI: Jason Lives") is excellent and a perfect song to close the album with.

I could, and have, listened to Constrictor on repeat for hours on end. While there are a couple of B-sides, I feel Constructor is a very underrated Alice Cooper album and, as such, I hope you will give it a listen as I truly believe it is worth your time.

For this review, I listened to the MCA Records (MCAD-5761) CD. The mastering is a bit of a mixed bag. I like it as it has that warm and fuzzy analogue 80's tape sound, but CD normally has a more clinical tonality. It simply messes with your mind as the analogue and digital streams are being crossed. Personally, I don't mind either tonality, but it is something to note when listening to the album.

From an artwork perspective, I love the cover art. Even with CD-sized graphics, the snake still looks fake! It is frankly comical that way and certainly reminiscent of the Alice Cooper character. What I can't fathom, however, is the use of pink on the rear cover and spine of the CD. I guess all one needs to do is look back at glam rock and professional wrestling in the 80s to remember that pink was the in-colour for hardasses. How fashion and times changed! The liner notes are also printed on an equally questionable yellow, but at least the complete lyrics and production notes are present. It isn’t bothersome, but it just isn't a colour scheme that I have come to expect from Alice Cooper albums. Although, Pretties For You makes me think twice about that statement! Regardless, it is a prized possession in my CD collection and I love it as much for the musicality as I do for the interesting artwork style that beckons me to recall a bygone era of towel hats, short shorts, and long socks, held high with elastic, while wearing sandals. Yes, there are pictures of me from this era, but trust me when I say that nobody needs to see that fashion era again. Nostalgia be damned!

Constrictor is available on CD, the TIDAL Store (16/44.1kHz FLAC), and iTunes. If you prefer streaming, you can check out Alice Cooper's Constrictor on Spotify and Apple Music.

Click here to read other Alice Cooper reviews by Subjective Sounds.

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Metallica - Garage Inc. (Album Review)

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Metallica - Garage Inc. (Album Review)

Most would agree that Metallica has had an incredible career. However, there are many that would also argue their shifting musicality has not seen the same success. Personally, I really enjoy Metallica's entire catalogue. That said, I don't class Lulu as a Metallica album per se, but I do recognise and appreciate their willingness to experiment.

During the 90s, Metallica exploded as a mainstream act that left all other Thrash Metal bands wondering if they took a wrong turn with their own musical trajectory. Yes, I know some of you will claim Metallica sold out and weren't true to their fans. However, I know of no artist that purposely limits themselves just to please the fans. I'm sorry to tell you this, but we are not important. Sure, they say how great we are in every city they visit, but once they fly out, they issue the same platitudes to the next city of fans; Spinal Tap’s Simpsons cameo anyone? Truthfully, this isn’t a bad thing but it does prove all musicians, not just Metallica, owe us nothing. Otherwise, The Beatles would have never left Liverpool, Aerosmith would never have ventured past Boston, and AC/DC would only be recording and touring in Australia. We, the music fans, would need to gravitate to them – Woodstock style. Admittedly, music festivals handle this alternate reality in a quasi-way that ensures the journey of the music lover is equal to the music itself. Hence, it is my belief that an artist owes us fans nothing and that we should relish the albums that speak to us, and disregard those that fall short. That is certainly how I deal with Lulu. After all, we don’t need to own everything Metallica releases, do we?

Regardless, throughout the 90s, Bob Rock was a key driving force behind Metallica’s mainstream success. It was a radio friendly, welcoming sound, that would make the band a household name. Going back to their roots, momentarily, Metallica and Rock would collaborate on the exceptional covers album Garage Inc.. Although the producer’s role was still relevant, I absolutely love the statement in the liner notes that the album was ‘Somewhat produced’. Personally, I would say that it just wasn't over produced and it most likely appealed to these who disliked the production elements of the Self-Titled Black Album and Load/ReLoad albums. However, despite including covers that were closer to Metallica’s original ethos, some of the newer recordings are a little less Thrash driven and that may deter some listeners. That said, the selected songs, both new and old, merge into a compilation that has become one of my favourite Metallica albums as it has a little bit of everything. 

Following the release of the album in November of 1998, the double CD went everywhere with me. It seemed that my Discman (really a Philips CD walkman requiring 4 AA batteries), was destined to run out of juice just as I was rocking away in my own world, traversing the suburbs of Sydney. Nothing was more infuriating than boarding a train only to find the battery died five minutes into the hour long journey. Needless to say, I ended up carrying spare batteries. Fast forward to the modern era and I can be thankful that my Oppo HA-2 DAC/Headphone Amplifier not only provides an exceptional sound quality that the iPhone can’t even dream of matching, but it doubles as a charger for the aforementioned iDevice. Nevertheless, I look back with fondness, rather than regret, as it was all about the music. While the portable CD player probably sounded horrid, my teenage ears knew no better and I simply enjoyed the music. Sometimes I wish to go back to that era when specifications, who mastered the album, and which source was used was seemingly irrelevant.

Unfortunately, Garage Inc. would become another victim in the MP3 era as I digitised and sold this masterpiece. To say I was a bloody idiot is a major understatement. I guess my only saving grace is that the MP3 buried in my past and I once again own this record, on vinyl, and I couldn't be happier. Anyway, enough of my incessant rambling, find a comfortable seat and join me for the next couple of hours as we enjoy Metallica’s album Garage, Inc..

DISC 1 / Side One (New Recordings '98)

Free Speech For The Dumb is a fat Thrash-infused song that encourages you to turn the volume up. It isn't my favourite song on the album, but it gets the album off to an incredible start.

It's Electric is an excellent song that is perfectly suited to Hetfield's vocal style and the overall musicality of the band. It is mastered with a little too much focus on the treble region, but that is a minor quibble.

Sabbra Cadabra has a gorgeous guitar intro. The groove is so compelling that you will be toe tapping and head bopping subconsciously. The overall sonic signature of Sabbra Cadabra is cemented in blues rock and roll and I absolutely love it!

Turn The Page was an exceptional song when originally performed by Bob Seger, but Metallica has made it their own and has taken the song to another level. It is one of Metallica’s greatest recordings and is one of their songs I play regularly.

DISC 1 / Side Two (New Recordings '98)

Die, Die My Darling is a killer rock track. I love it!

Loverman may initially sound like a strange pick as one wouldn't normally associate Nick Cave And The Bad Seeds with Metallica, but Metallica certainly recorded an excellent rendition that is worthy of the musicality heard on the original recording. Both versions are excellent, but I find that I gravitate to Metallica’s interpretation as I feel it is the more polished of the two. 

Mercyful Fate is an exceptional song that commands you to turn the volume knob to the right. Yes, your neighbours will likely call the boys and girls in blue, but it will be worth it! Seriously, listening at lower volumes destroys the musicality and energy of this song. It is expertly recorded and mixed while being nothing short of a rock and roll symphony. King Diamond and Hank Shermann would be proud!

DISC 2 / Side One (New Recordings '98)

Astronomy has always been a favourite of mine. The incredible Blue Öyster Cult may have recorded the original epic, but the first time I ever heard Astronomy was when Metallica covered it for Garage Inc.. Hence, as excellent as the original is, I will always hold Metallica’s rendition near and dear to my heart. Interestingly, it would be this song, along with Don’t Fear The Reaper, that would push me to become a dedicated fan of Blue Öyster Cult. Therefore, one can conclude that while some cover albums aren’t worth listening to, there are others, such as Garage Inc., that are done with so much respect to the original, you feel compelled to track down the original recordings.

Whisky In The Jar is an awesome groove-filled track. It is another song that compels me to sing-a-long as my body moves to the rhythm of the music. I probably look like I’ve lost control of myself, when in public, but I don’t care, Whisky In The Jar is that good!

Tuesday's Gone is perhaps the only song on the album that I don't like. It isn't a bad song on its own, it just isn't well suited to the album. Plus, every time I listen to it, I think of Bob Geldof. I also feel Metallica sounds too much like Bon Jovi on this track. I love Bon Jovi, but this is a Metallica record. As I think about it more, perhaps it is the nasal grind of the Geldof/Bon Jovi duet, I Don’t Like Mondays, that reminds me of Metallica’s rendition of Tuesday’s Gone. That all said, I much prefer Lynyrd Skynyrd’s original as it is less monotonous. I guess we can be thankful that Metallica didn’t try to interpret Free Bird as some songs should never be covered.

The More I See wraps up the '98 recordings in style with a harder hitting song than Tuesday's Gone. It also displaces the ridiculous outro Metallica recorded as part of Tuesday's Gone. The More I See may be meat and potatoes rock and roll, but Metallica’s added gravy ensures the song sounds fantastic.

DISC 2 / Side Two (Garage Days Re-Revisited '87)

Helpless has an incredible rhythm and riff-centric sound. The soundstage, while dynamic, does border on the limits of audible compression, but manages to stay away from the mess that came with Death Magnetic. Basically, Helpless is recorded, mixed, and mastered well for the style of music and if Death Magnetic had been mastered with this approach, I dare say there would have been less opposition to an otherwise exceptional album.

The Small Hours is musical perfection as it terrifies me and simultaneously excites me. That haunting introduction and beat would be the perfect musical accompaniment for any horror film set in an insane asylum. It is pure brilliance from start to finish and in some ways reminds me of Blue Oyster Cult’s Don’t Fear The Reaper.

The Wait has incredible energy, but I feel Hetfield’s distorted vocal lets the song down as he sounds lost in the soundstage. While it certainly isn't a bad song, it also doesn't feel polished. Although, I guess that is the point of a 'Garage' style album, isn’t it?

Crash Course In Brain Surgery features the bass that Newsted was deprived of on ...And Justice For All. Overall, it is a solid cover and worthy of inclusion.

Last Caress/Green Hell is one of the greatest covers/recordings Metallica has ever made. It is punk rock with a little thrash thrown in for good measure. I love it!

DISC 3 / Side One (Garage Days Re-visited '84 + B-Sides & One-Offs '88-'91 )

Am I Evil? YES, I AM!...I always get a little carried away with this song. It is bloody brilliant and if Satan has a playlist, this would most certainly be on it.

Blitzkrieg is as thrashy as you can get. Get that air guitar out and enjoy!

Breadfan has a killer riff but, beyond that, I don't feel drawn to the song. Hence, for me, this is a filler track.

The Prince is somewhat similar to breadfan as I don't connect with the song on an emotional level. That said, I would be lying if I said that I didn't enjoy elements of each song. I can certainly point to aspects that I adore, but if it doesn’t come together cohesively, then those elements remain highlights in an otherwise pedestrian performance.

Stone Cold Crazy is a great song. I love the original as it is one of Queen's best, but Metallica, yet again, takes the song to another level of excellence.

DISC 3 / Side Two (B-Sides & One-Offs '88-'91 + Motorheadache ‘95)

So What is a great way to start the sixth side of the vinyl release. It’s rude and crude, but it’s such a fun song! If you can look past the overt profanity, you will thoroughly enjoy this epic rock song. So What reminds me of Steel Panther's style in that regard.

Killing Time is a solid cover song that I neither like or dislike. It is a filler track and is perfectly suited for that purpose.

Overkill raises mixed emotions as I believe that some music just shouldn’t be covered. Perhaps it is just me, but covering Motorhead is akin to Avenged Sevenfold covering Metallica. It works, really well, but I'm not sure it should be done.

Damage Case is a great song, with a great groove.

Stone Dead Forever is an excellent song, but I feel Hetfield is imitating Kilmister, rather than making the song his own. This is, of course, the danger of cover songs versus recording someone else’s unpublished song. Yes, imitation is a form of flattery, but I have always had reservations about it when listening to cover songs.

Too Late Too Late is a perfect song to close this epic release on. While it encourages me to listen to the album again, and stay within Metallica's catalogue, Garage Inc. is a lengthy release and I seldom follow it up with anything else as I want to savour the experience.

Metallica's Garage Inc. is an incredible covers album. There really isn't a bad song on the album and while I may not connect with a few of the songs, they certainly work well with the overall style of the compilation. It is quite clear that if Metallica ran out of song ideas and got bored playing their classics, they could make it as one of the greatest cover bands in history.

For this review, I listened to the 2014 Blackened pressing (cat: BLCKND013-1). The mastering was superb and at no time did I long for more musicality from the album or my Pro-Ject Debut Carbon turntable (fitted with the Ortofon OM20 needle). I have also listened to the TIDAL Hi-Fi edition and while the core mastering is the same, I truly enjoy the vinyl tonality just that little bit more. Without a doubt, the vinyl edition is a prized possession in my collection. Besides sounding incredible, the vinyl layout and design, while mimicking the original CD, is full featured and offers a valued added proposition for fans and collectors alike.

Metallica's Garage Inc. is available on Vinyl, CD, the TIDAL Store (16/44.1 kHz FLAC), and iTunes (Mastered For iTunes). If you prefer streaming, Garage Inc.. is also available on Spotify and Apple Music.

Click here to read other Metallica reviews by Subjective Sounds.  

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Iron Maiden – Somewhere Back In Time – The Best Of: 1980-1989 (Album Review)

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Iron Maiden – Somewhere Back In Time – The Best Of: 1980-1989 (Album Review)

Compilations are often thrown together with little thought and consideration. Most of the time they consist only of songs that have been hugely successful as singles. While this Best Of does include many of the songs we know and love, Maiden decided to do something a little different with this release. The inclusion of live tracks throughout the album, really sets this release apart from other compilations and encourages the dedicated fan to pick up an album they otherwise may have left in the record store. It really is a value-added proposition for the consumer and I praise the band and the record label for attempting to do something different.

Some of you may be concerned with the flow of the album and how the mix of studio and live performances blend together. Well, I can set your mind at ease by letting you know the mastering is exceptional and all music, live and studio recorded, is perfectly matched. Yes, I acknowledge many live performances are tweaked in the studio, but I’m not even going to entertain that thought as the entire album experience is a worthy piece of musical art.

Speaking of art, the cover art alone offers enough justification to purchase this compilation on vinyl. That is one badass cover!

Over the years I have always appreciated a compilation album; they are great for car journeys and gifts. This Maiden release is so compelling that I may even pick up a copy on CD for my son. I keep buying him compilation albums by all the greatest musicians, across all genres, as I feel it gives him a broad knowledge and appreciation of music. Yes, I could always set up a TIDAL Family Plan, but as much as I adore TIDAL, it is impersonal compared to a CD that can be gifted, held, and grabbed on the way to the car. Not to mention he gets to experience the all-important liner notes.  

Intro (Churchill's Speech) is simply a spoken introduction to the live performance of Aces High.

Aces High (Live) is an exceptional performance. Yes, as I mentioned earlier, I’m aware that many live recordings are not as 'live' as many would hope. However, I simply don't care as the essence of the performance is present. While I'm not saying that Maiden used studio trickery to achieve this sound, I also can't ignore the possibility as it is sonically perfect.

2 Minutes To Midnight is a killer track. I love it!

Every time I listen to The Trooper I immediately recall and want to watch, Metal Evolution – The Series. If you haven't checked it out, it is a must see! Seriously, I give you permission to stop reading and give it a look. Back to the song and The Trooper is Iron Maiden 101. You will, if you haven't already, be turning this up to 11. The Trooper has to be one of the best Maiden recordings ever with a guitar riff that is perfect in every sense of the word. However, I tend to feel that way about most of their work. They are great, aren’t they?

Wasted Years has some incredible musicality. However, I tend to get listening fatigue by the end of the song. That isn’t to say it is a bad song, just that I lack a connection with it. Perhaps it is due to listening to it countless times over the years, or perhaps it has been due to hearing a lacklustre master. Thankfully the mastering on this release is fantastic and the song has never sounded better in my opinion. It is full and spacious with all drum elements, even the cymbals, sounding just as they should. You can hear the shimmer of the high hats as they dissolve throughout the soundstage. It no longer sounds like it was recorded using pots, pans, and tin cans. The mastering is another justification for picking up the vinyl release, provided it isn't a picture disc release. While some audiophiles may still proclaim it to not be perfect, it is perfect for Maiden.

Children Of The Damned is about as mellow as Maiden gets, but what an incredible song. I absolutely love it!

The Number Of The Beast is a fantastic song, but I'm not sure which master they used as the cymbal crashes are horrid. They sound like someone has been hitting really thin sheets of aluminium. It's a shame because this one element impacts my appreciation of the song.

Run To The Hills is a favourite of mine. As I listen to this album, I am struck by the sonic journey Iron Maiden continually takes us on. They are one of the best, if not the best, in my opinion!

Phantom Of The Opera (Live) is an exceptional song and this live performance is a perfect rendition of the song. While I'm not a fan of going to live concerts, as I have had bad sonic experiences, Maiden is one that I wish I had seen when they last toured Australia. That said, I still haven’t got over the horrid sound of AC/DC’s last concert in Sydney. The music was out-of-sync and the mix wasn't the greatest, to begin with. That experience really tarnished my appreciation of the band and I swore to never let another live performance have that impact on me. Hence, I missed out on Maiden only a few months later.

The Evil That Men Do has some excellent guitar work, although that could be said about every Maiden recording. They really are the definition of a riff-based band. While The Evil That Men Do isn’t my favourite Maiden song, it is a worthy inclusion and feels well suited to the lineup of selected songs. For me, however, I believe my indifferent towards the song stems from it being too similar, in style, to The Trooper.

Wrathchild (Live) is another hard hitting live performance. The lead guitar work is exquisite!

Can I Play With Madness has some excellent elements, but I feel the repetition of ‘Can I Play With Madness’, with regards to the vocal chorus, is a little too much to tolerate upon repeat plays.

Powerslave is a killer song with an addictively smooth rhythm.

Hallowed Be Thy Name is one of my all-time favourite Maiden tunes. It really doesn't get much better than this. Pure perfection!

Iron Maiden (Live) is a fantastic way to close the album, although the song doesn’t match the tonality and polish heard throughout the album. Yes, it sounds like Maiden, but it also sounds like a bonus track was randomly included at the last minute. That said, I love this song and without a doubt, I feel compelled to listen to the compilation again and stay within Maiden's catalogue.

Overall, this is one Iron Maiden release that you must add to your collection. While it only deals with a small portion of their career, it’s an era in which they were most prolific.

For this review, I listened to the TIDAL Masters/MQA 24/88.2 kHz edition. It is exceptional and shows off the capabilities of MQA. I'll be completely honest and say that as much as I would like to own this release on vinyl, if I couldn't track down a copy, I wouldn't be disappointed with only being able to listen to the MQA edition. I have also listened to the 16/44.1 kHz TIDAL Hi-Fi edition and while the mastering is excellent, it is louder and doesn't sound as full and rich as the MQA edition. MQA is simply one step closer to the original master and while debate rages on, in the audiophile community, I am simply enjoying the music. I honestly haven't heard Maiden sound this good. Their entire catalogue is available in MQA and I can thoroughly recommend each and every one.

Somewhere Back In Time – The Best Of: 1980-1989 is available on Vinyl, CD, the TIDAL Store (FLAC 16/44.1 kHz), and iTunes (Mastered For iTunes). For those who prefer streaming, this compilation is also available on Spotify and Apple Music.

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Avi Rosenfeld - Very Heepy Very Purple VI (Album Review)

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Avi Rosenfeld - Very Heepy Very Purple VI (Album Review)

Deep Purple, Dio, Iron Maiden, and Rainbow are amongst the greatest rock and roll bands to have ever existed. Hence, it is hardly surprising that prolific guitarist Ari Rosenfeld has written and recorded an album paying homage to these pioneers.

Very Heepy Very Purple VI is Rosenfeld's 30th album and while he’s not yet a household name, there is a lot to like about an independent artist that forges their own destiny. As such, you won't be able to listen to his work on any of the mainstream streaming platforms. Initially, I thought this omission was strange as one would want as much recognition as possible. However, when you consider the pittance streaming services pay artists, you can't blame talented independents for looking at alternatives. 

Rosenfeld's alternative is to utilise bandcamp. You can sample the entire album for free, or purchase the album at a price you determine to be appropriate. A simply fantastic idea! If you do decide to purchase the album, you will receive the MP3 and FLAC editions of the album. A purchase will also allow streaming via the official bandcamp app. Most importantly, a purchase will help a very talented independent artist.

Very Heepy Very Purple VI is also intriguing as each song has been recorded with a different vocalist and musician lineup. Rosenfeld is, of course, the sole conductor of the project and while the lineup of musicians may initially raise questions of consistency, the result is surprisingly pleasing as all songs morph perfectly into the theme of the album. If nothing else, that fact alone should be a testament to Rosenfeld's vision and musical skill.

Battles Rain has a groovy Deep Purple feel with vocals to match. It is like a crossover between Deep Purple and Iron Maiden. I thoroughly enjoy it! It is a great song that sets the stage for what you're about to hear.

Crash Into The Burning Sun has a killer guitar solo that will appeal to air guitarists everywhere. It is a good song, but I'm unsure about the choice of vocalist for this track. Don't get me wrong, Arpie Gamson has a great vocal presence, but I feel another song on the album may have suited him better.

Sole Survivor has a blues rock and roll feel that I adore. The song is great, but I would prefer to hear a much wider soundstage as the musicality, while excellent, is just a little too shallow. 

Help Me My Brother is exceptional! Rilvas Silva is the perfect vocalist for this song. I also love the electronic-styled interludes that remind me of the 8-bit computer gaming era.

The Desert And The Wind has a killer demonic introduction. William Stewart’s violin riffing is amazing and simply has to be heard. Yes, I truly believe classical instruments can and should be implemented in rock and roll music, albeit on a case by case basis. One only needs to hear how extraordinary Metallica sounded with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra on S&M to understand the appeal of symphonic metal. I also enjoy Guilherme de Siervi’s vocal delivery, and to be honest, the entire composition is perfect. The end result is that The Desert And The Wind is one of my favourite songs on the album.

Castles Burning reminds me again of the sound from the 8-bit video gaming era. While that isn't necessarily a bad thing, the song is strong enough on its own to avoid these musical cliches. A remix would be recommended here as I would love to hear an edgier version of this song.

Shes A Woman (sic) is a B-side. It sounds more like a demo than a finished recording. 

Dragon Slayer is Deep Purple 101. I love it! Yet, it is also Maiden and Dio inspired. Despite crossing the streams, the merging of inspiration pays off. However, I'm not entirely sold on the Marimba solo.

State Of Decay has an interesting melody with a key focus on the keyboards. It works well but was not an immediate favourite of mine. However, it did grow on me.

Lonely Ship has some glorious guitar and bass work. The vocals, by Peter Rudolf, are well suited to the song and I find that it encourages me to listen to the album again.

Overall, Very Heepy Very Purple VI is an incredible independent release that Rosenfeld and his musical collaborators should be proud of. If I were a record company executive or a producer, I would be signing Rosenfeld immediately. The man has serious raw talent and I can only imagine the sonic wonders he would release with some major backing.

Very Heepy Very Purple VI has very few flaws for an independent release. Other than issues expressed above, my only feeling is the album could have been mastered differently. A wider soundstage and greater instrument separation would be appreciated as I want to be enveloped in sound, rather than acknowledging that the sound is emanating from my speakers. That said, compared with some of the mainstream masterings, this album sounds exceptionally good. After all, Iron Maiden has some of the best and worst masterings, of the same album, that I have ever come across. I love Maiden, but the mastering variations in their releases are nothing short of infuriating. That said, the 2015 remasters in MQA 24/96 kHz, from TIDAL Masters, are excellent. 

This review was based on listening to the 16 and 24-bit master WAV files provided to me by the artist.

Very Heepy Very Purple VI is available for purchase and streaming on bandcamp. You can also find out more about Avi Rosenfeld on his website, or via Facebook.

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