Motörhead - Motörhead (Album Review)

Comment

Motörhead - Motörhead (Album Review)

There are imitators, but there is only one Motörhead; there will never be another. Whether it is the sex, drugs, and rock and roll persona that came naturally to Lemmy, and his musical counterparts, or their musical talent that was beyond reproach, there is little doubt that Motörhead changed rock and roll forever, starting with this eponymous debut.

While Motörhead was not technically the first Motörhead album, it was the first released to the public with the earlier effort, On Parole being shelved until 1979. This review is based on the original 8-track release from 1977. While an expanded 40th Anniversary Edition is also available, I’m somewhat of a purist and while there is nothing fundamentally wrong with extended releases, there is something special about the original 33-minute release. It leaves you wanting more and I don’t know about you, dear reader, but I feel that is a good thing.

The artwork is also iconic and debuted the War Pig mascot that would become as recognisable as Iron Maiden’s Eddie, AC/DC’s lightning logo, and Metallica’s Ninja Star-inspired logo. 

Motörhead is a killer opener that was originally recorded by Hawkwind, when Lemmy was a member, and by Motörhead for the On Parole album. The Hawkwind original is, as you’d expect, more psychedelic but is, in my opinion, a superb recording with a killer violin solo. It was also the last song Lemmy wrote for Hawkwind. The On Parole recording is rather raw, but that isn’t necessarily a bad thing as the motorcycle revving introduction is incredible. This version, by comparison, is a perfect evolution of the song, even though I’ve always felt Philthy’s drum track, while sensational, was compromised. When listening via speakers, it isn’t as apparent, but when using headphones, there is a flat wallop sound to the drums. Look, Motörhead was never going to win any audiophile awards, but it just doesn’t sound right as it is a little concealed; of course, that could be part of the song’s and album’s appeal as it has most certainly stood the test of time. 

Vibrator is an old-school rock and roll tune that I simply adore and the drums on this recording are significantly better than Motörhead when listening on headphones. There are some killer musical riffs to be heard here and if you haven’t already, may I suggest you turn the volume up. This version is more rock and roll than the original found on On Parole and perhaps the most appealing aspect is Lemmy’s deeper, whiskey-soaked, vocal delivery as Larry Wallis’ original vocal on the On Parole version is piss-weak. 

Lost Johnny is a solid rock tune. It isn’t anything to write home about, but it is a perfect addition to the album with a killer guitar solo by Fast Eddie. This version is so similar to that as heard on On Parole that I’m torn as to which I prefer. Of course, Lost Johnny’s origins go further back as the song was originally written by Lemmy for Hawkwind and I adore that version, feeling it is much stronger than the subsequent Motörhead re-recordings.

Iron Horse / Born To Lose is one of the coolest, no, it has to be the coolest, song on the album. Lemmy was, without a doubt, one of the greatest bass players to have ever recorded a tune. He had incredible rhythm. Bloody brilliant! If you haven’t checked out the original, while very similar to  this re-recording, it simply must be heard as it’s equally impressive. 

White Line Fever is another rhythmic masterpiece, but Lemmy sounds a little too far back in the mix. It isn’t a mood killer, but I would have loved to have heard his vocal more prominent in the mix.

Keep Us On The Road is a song you can groove to. A killer tune! 

The Watcher has incredible rhythm and is yet another song, from the Motorhead collection, where you’ll need your air guitar to fully enjoy it. It is, thankfully, significantly stronger than the version from On Parole. Although, as with a few of the original Motorhead songs, The Watcher was originally written by Lemmy for Hawkwind and that psychedelic acoustically-styled rendition is simply magical.

The Train Kept A Rollin’ is a classic song that’s been covered by a who’s who of rock and roll with Aerosmith probably championing it most throughout their career with the song being featured on Get Your Wings. Nevertheless, the bass-heavy groove that Lemmy throws into the song really works well and while I remain unconvinced that The Train Kept A Rollin’ was the perfect closer for this eponymous debut, I find that it still compels me enough to listen to the album again.

Motörhead may not have been the first set of studio recordings from Motörhead, but the album showcased a band that was highly polished as a result of extensive touring; especially considering the album was recorded in 48 hours*. Is Motörhead subjectively a stronger album than On Parole? Yes, I believe it is, but On Parole is definitely one album you should check out as it is arguably the true origin of Motorhead and this debut is merely a more polished re-recording of many of the original tracks. If you’re at all interested in Motörhead, then this eponymous debut is essential for your collection. It is raw, full of energy, and is pure rock and roll. 

Motörhead is available to own on Vinyl and CD. 

Motörhead 40th Anniversary Edition is also available on CD and Apple Music.

*Lemmy: The Definitive Biography - By Mick Wall (pg. 129)

Comment

KISS – August 24, 2019 – Saratoga Performing Arts Center (Concert Review)

Comment

KISS – August 24, 2019 – Saratoga Performing Arts Center (Concert Review)

When I was in high school KISS was playing at a local venue. I was planning on going with a group of girls, but as usual, my mother said no. She wouldn’t let me go to concerts, and she especially wasn’t letting me see KISS, even though the venue was about five miles away and parents volunteered to bring us both ways.

Flash forward to late 2003. KISS is touring with Aerosmith. I’m excited-I had never seen Aerosmith, either. My husband can only tolerate so much, and this was one concert he refused to attend. So I did the next best thing: I brought my two oldest kids, who were both in high school. Yes, I’m the cool mom!

Which brings us to August 2019. Still the cool mom, my oldest son and I were in the front row balcony when KISS brought their tour to my neck of the woods. Thousands of fans packed the amphitheater and lawn, some in face paint, many in KISS t-shirts from this tour and tours from years ago. The “KISS Army,” as the die-hard fans are called, were in full force.

“You wanted the best, you got the best. The hottest band in the world…KISS!!” The curtain dropped, and descending from the ceiling were Gene Simmons, Paul Stanley, and Tommy Thayer, playing the opening licks to “Detroit Rock City.” Drummer Eric Singer was on an elevated platform at the back of the stage. Fireworks and fire were prevalent throughout the concert; I could feel the heat of the fire from the balcony!

KISS played the hits you would expect at one of their concerts: “Shout It Out Loud,” “Calling Dr. Love,” “Deuce,” and “Lick It Up.” KISS doesn’t simply sing their songs, they perform their songs. With the exception of “Beth,” beautifully sung by Eric Singer while playing the piano alone on the stage during the encore, every song had pyrotechnics, lasers, lights, rising platforms-more like a show within a show. And the crowd ate it up.

Paul Stanley, at 67 years old, is just as enthusiastic and happy to be on stage as he was when KISS was in their heyday during the 1970s. His schtick was obviously rehearsed and a bit insincere: “we will never, ever forget this night.” But that can be forgiven as he was relating to the crowd and showing appreciation. As a concert fan, I would rather hear that than have the artist ignore the fans.

A highlight of the show was “I Was Made For Loving You,” where Stanley was zip lined to the back of the amphitheater to a second stage. 

Before finishing the encore Stanley lead the crowd in singing happy birthday to Gene Simmons, whose birthday was the next day. Simmons proudly told the fans he was 70 *bleep bleep* years old. You’d never know it as he stood there in full leather and platform boots.

The just over two-hour concert ended with arguably their most popular and well-known song, “Rock and Roll All Nite,” complete with KISS balloons dropped into the crowd and enough confetti to keep the maintenance team busy for days. 

KISS isn't just a concert, it’s an experience. The fans, ranging in age from grade school kids to senior citizens collecting social security, were looking for a good time that night and they got their money’s worth. It was loud, gawdy, sometimes silly, even cartoonish-and the fans wouldn’t have it any other way.

Comment

ABBA – Gold (Greatest Hits Compilation Vinyl Review)

Comment

ABBA – Gold (Greatest Hits Compilation Vinyl Review)

ABBA’s Gold is without a doubt one of the greatest compilations ever released. I can listen to it continuously without necessarily wanting more as there isn’t a lacklustre song to be heard on this exceptional release. However, that hasn’t stopped the Swedish juggernaut from reissuing the Gold collection countless times and adding to it with More ABBA Gold and a 40th Anniversary Edition that also includes additional B-sides not previously released on the aforementioned titles.

This review, however, will focus on the original ABBA Gold; specifically the 2014 vinyl reissue. However, as a lifelong ABBA fan, I’ll most likely review the additional releases, in the future, so check back regularly. 

When originally released in 1992, I was in awe. I swear I wore that cassette tape out as I played it that much. For me, it was new and fresh as I was only a teenager at the time and Abba Gold would ultimately cement my interest in the band following my admiration of Arrival. It was, therefore, a triumphant moment the reissue was announced and released. Although, something was not quite right. Looking up the history of the album, I was able to find out that he edition of Abba Gold that I had become smitten with was in-fact the Australian release, with three different songs that were hugely popular down under. The 2014 vinyl re-issue was in-fact the International edition of Abba Gold and I would lament the fact that I sold the cassette so many years ago when MP3s were taking the world by storm. Nevertheless, it only took a few spins on the turntable for me to connect with the International tracking of the album and since then I have been content with the varied song selection.  

The records themselves are presented in a slide-out design that I appreciate for its simplicity. A gatefold would have been nice, but I’m sure I’m not alone when I lament the challenges of getting records in and out of gatefolds at times. No, they aren’t a deal-breaker, but they do require a little more fiddling. Nevertheless, the inner sleeves are adorned with photographs and a thoroughly enjoyable essay, penned by British rock music journalist John Tobler.  

The records feature the stunning red Polydor label and are pressed and mastered well, with consistent quality. While I wouldn’t say this or any ABBA release is necessarily audiophile-grade, many of the included songs sound significantly better than they do on ABBA’s other vinyl reissues. That said, this release isn’t perfect and as much as it pains me to admit it, the Apple Music/iTunes (Apple Digital Master) edition of Abba Gold and ABBA’s broader back catalogue, sound remarkably good and arguably better than any ABBA vinyl or CD release I have in my collection. 

Nevertheless, while the records are flat, there is a little more surface noise than I would generally like. It isn’t necessarily distracting unless you find yourself listening to your record collection via headphones. Also, and this is an obvious pressing error, when Dancing Queen starts, you hear the song softly through the left channel before the stereo tracking comes in. It isn’t that the tracks are offset from each other, just that when it was pressed, the left channel was prematurely pressed. Thankfully, once the stereo track kicks in, Dancing Queen plays perfectly with no audible distortion or apparent timing issues. It is a surprising error, given the status and cultural importance of ABBA, but it hasn’t been the first, or last time, that their vinyl pressings have raised eyebrows amongst music lovers. Overall, however, ABBA’s Gold 2014 vinyl reissue sounds very good and is thoroughly enjoyable to listen to. 

Side One

Dancing Queen, as mentioned earlier, has a dual-ghosting introduction that, while initially distracting, fades into the song perfectly allowing one to turn up the volume, sing along, and dance to one of ABBA’s very best tunes. 

Knowing Me, Knowing You is sonically beautiful. I’ve always enjoyed audio panning and Knowing Me, Knowing You uses this technique perfectly. Perhaps the most enjoyable element of this song is the tempo. Have you ever noticed how it is a slow song, yet also a fast song? This dichotomy is intriguing and I feel it’s part of the reason why the song is so good as it has an organic sound that is neither perfect or erroneous, but equally both. Sensational!

Take A Chance On Me is another ABBA classic that encourages the body to move to the groove. Seriously, try and sit still when listening to this song, it is almost impossible. 

Mamma Mia is an absolute masterpiece and the karaoke song for the budding amateur singer. Yes, this middle-aged man thoroughly enjoys singing along to Mamma Mia. It is simply, that good! 

Lay All Your Love On Me has quite a bit of noise and a little inner groove distortion, despite the record being cleaned and run on a well balanced Pro-ject Debut Carbon turntable with an Ortofon OM20 needle. A shame considering just how good this song is. Nevertheless, it is a perfect song to close out Side One. 

Side Two

Super Trouper is one of my all-time favourite ABBA songs. The harmonious intertwining of the vocals is pure gold and the musicality is delivered at just the perfect tempo. Pure perfection!

I Have A Dream is a great song, but I’ve never been convinced that it follows on well from Super Trouper. It is, of course, a slower song and I think I would have preferred it to be presented at the beginning of side three. Nevertheless, it is placed where it is and once I get over my objection to its placement, I can thoroughly enjoy this ballad/folk tune that is pure ABBA.

The Winner Takes It All is a beautiful story-driven song. Agnetha‘s vocal is absolutely beautiful but my only criticism is the shrillness of the vocal and piano in the high end as it can be a little jarring if the volume is turned up too loud.

Money, Money, Money is a killer ABBA tune. 

S.O.S is simply magnificent!

Side Three

Chiquitita is beautiful, although when the song enters it’s upbeat tempo, with a substantial volume boost, it can be a little jarring on the senses. 

Fernando is superb and while I don’t have a favourite ABBA song, Fernando for me is only bested by Eagle. Both are so relaxing and sonically pleasing that I could listen to either on repeat for an eternity. 

Voulez-Vous removes me from my relaxed state and wants to get me on the dance floor, singing along, as if it’s the most natural thing to do. The chorus is exceptional as is the rhythm and the vocal harmony. It’s such a great song!

Gimme! Gimme! Gimme! (A Man After Midnight) is one of my favourite ABBA songs and yes, this heterosexual man sings this song loud and proud. The orchestral introduction is epic and it is arguably the pinnacle of disco-based music, although there are so many sensational examples to choose from. Regardless, Gimme! Gimme! Gimme! (A Man After Midnight) is one of the greatest disco-based songs of the era and has remained timeless, still feeling fresh in the modern era.

Side Four

Does Your Mother Know has one of the best intros for any ABBA song, doesn’t it? Does Your Mother Know is a killer pop/rock tune that you can sing along to, dance to, and turn the volume up to so that you’ll irritate your neighbours. Surely, ticking all those boxes is the sign of a good song, yes?

One Of Us is an earworm waiting to happen. You’ve been warned! However, I would still recommend it as One Of Us is magnificent; much like most of ABBA’s final studio album, The Visitors, is. 

The Name Of The Game is perhaps the only song on Gold that I question its worthiness for inclusion. Is it a great song? Absolutely. Do I enjoy it when it comes on? You bet. Yet, I still don’t feel it is worthy of this compilation. Instead, if I had selected the tracks to be included on this release, I would have opted for Eagle and would have ensured The Name Of The Game made it to More Abba Gold

Thank You For The Music is a little campy but every time it comes on, it reminds me of how thankful we should be for the music we know and love and even the music that doesn’t appeal to our subjective selves, for it will give joy to another music lover. And, yes, thank you ABBA for the music!

Waterloo is, as I’ve mentioned before, a fun song. I don’t know about you, but I feel it is the perfect closing song for this compilation as it simultaneously encourages me to listen to the album again as well as setting it aside and allowing Waterloo to be a repetitive earworm for the rest of the day. 

Overall, there was no need for More ABBA Gold as this core release covers ABBA’s illustrious career perfectly. I’m certain some may disagree with me, you may be one of them, but I would say that ABBA’s entire catalogue is so strong that it would have been far better for casual or new fans, coming into the ABBA universe post-ABBA Gold, to explore ABBA’s entire back catalogue. I say that because ultimately, ABBA has more gold-worthy songs than any single compilation could ever hope to deliver. 

ABBA’s Gold is worth owning for casual and hardcore fans alike. Often, when I just want to listen to ABBA, but I’m not sure what album I’d like to listen to, I’ll put on ABBA Gold and the desire to listen to one of my all-time favourite bands will be met. Compilations may get a bad wrap, but there are times when quality releases, such as this, remind me just how important an artist-based compilation is. 

ABBA’s Gold is available on Vinyl, CD, and Apple Music.

Comment

Wilco – A.M. (Album Review)

Comment

Wilco – A.M. (Album Review)

Each time I play A.M. I need to remind myself that this was Wilco’s debut release from 1995 and that it isn’t of the same, highly polished, style that is A Ghost Is Born and Schmilco; two of my favourite Wilco albums. That isn’t to say that A.M. is flawed, as it has some killer tunes and plenty of hidden gems that have stood the test of time, but it is an acknowledgement of their sonic shift on subsequent albums. 

I Must Be High isn’t a bad way to open this alternative country-rock album. A solid song, with a solid rhythm. What more could one ask for? 

Casino Queen has a killer blues-rock meets country rock feel that I swear would be a perfect song for The Rolling Stones to cover. Casino Queen is, without a doubt, one of my favourite songs on A.M. and is one of the best songs Wilco has ever recorded; I also consider it to be one of the very best rock tunes of the 20th Century. 

Box Full Of Letters isn’t the greatest. The musicality is too alternative and too campy. Plus, the rhythm is all over the place, thereby making it difficult to sync in with a particular groove. I also find Jeff Tweedy’s vocal on this song to be lacklustre. The guitar solo is its only saviour.

Shouldn’t Be Ashamed has everything Box Full Of Letters didn’t. It’s a brilliant song that is thoroughly enjoyable and compels me to move my body subconsciously to the rhythm. Perhaps the only flaw in Shouldn’t Be Ashamed is there is a little too much distortion in the guitar tracking. 

Pick Up The Change isn’t a bad toe-tapping song, but it isn’t anything to write home about either. A solid B-Side with some nice blues-based guitar work.

I Thought I Held You is a great tune that incorporates an interesting mix of the banjo with the steel guitar. It works incredibly well and gives the song a level of depth that ensures you become enveloped by the soundstage, especially during the final minute of the song. 

That’s Not The Issue is another chaotic rhythmic mess. It is akin to noise, rather than music. A shame as it breaks up the flow of the album considerably. 

It’s Just That Simple is a thoroughly enjoyable alternative country-rock tune and the creaminess of the instrumental interlude mid-song is absolutely marvellous. 

Should’ve Been In Love is an enjoyable B-side. Nothing more, nothing less. 

Passenger Side is fantastic, with a perfect mix between all sonic elements. I love it!

Dash 7 isn’t a bad B-side, but it is a little left of the centre. That may appeal to you, dear reader, or it may result in a confusing musical piece of art that will make you question if the song is good, bad, or merely adequate. 

Blue Eyed Soul is a song I adore. The tempo and progression of the song are perfect. I must admit, I do like Wilco’s slower rhythms as they suit the band perfectly.

Too Far Apart is an excellent track to close the album on with a rhythm and blues-based influence that will appeal to anyone interested in this style of music. There is no doubt in my mind that Too Far Apart is the perfect song to encourage me to play the album again and stay within Wilco’s catalogue of music. While an expanded Deluxe Edition has also been released, I’ve never felt the urge to listen to it as I feel the original 13-track, 45 minute, release is perfect for enjoying A.M. and I must be honest when I say that if a song didn’t make it to the original album, then it likely wasn’t good enough in the first place. Of course, your opinion may differ and if so, please let us know in the comments what song from the Deluxe Edition makes it a compelling alternative. 

Overall, A.M. is an excellent debut with some obvious flaws. The flaws, however, don’t detract from the album thereby ensuring that fans will appreciate this release along with newcomers who are after a somewhat raw country-rock sound with an alternative twist. 

A.M. is available on Vinyl, CD, and the iTunes Store

The Deluxe Edition of A.M. is available on Vinyl, CD, iTunes, and Apple Music

Comment

Paul Kelly – The A To Z Recordings (Compilation Review)

Comment

Paul Kelly – The A To Z Recordings (Compilation Review)

While I’ve often considered Paul Kelly’s Greatest Hits – Songs From The South, Vols. 1 & 2 to be amongst the finest compilation for any music lover’s collection, could the epic 105 song, 6-hour, A To Z Recordings eclipse it? 

Yes, I believe so. Of course, I’m a fan of the man who is rightfully regarded by many as one of Australia’s greatest singer-songwriters The Encyclopedia of Australian Rock And Pop.

I guess the real question we must ask ourselves, dear reader, is if there is such a thing as too much Paul Kelly? 

No, I don’t believe so!

Often when we think of albums, even compilations and live performances, incredible care has been taken when selecting tracks and their placement in order to make a coherent piece of audible art. However, Kelly has thrown the playbook out the window and between 2004 and 2010 was performing a four-part live performance, over four nights, that lined up much of his back catalog in alphabetical order. The concept is basic, yet extraordinary. Now, I know you may be wondering about the flow, given the songs are from different eras of Kelly’s celebrated career, but you need not be concerned for the flow of music is so compelling that you won’t want to stop listening until you reach the final song. Even then, I find myself playing the compilation again. It is astonishingly good.

The live performances, even though they were recorded in various locations, over several years, are perfectly matched sonically and are mixed and mastered beautifully. Kelly is incredible in the studio, but you really feel as though you’re experiencing the performance live on these recordings and thankfully the audience interaction has been kept to a minimum, thereby enhancing Kelly’s performance. 

My only criticism is the cover art. Seriously, I couldn’t think of a worse cover for such an incredible compilation and artist. Actually, no, I can, but that is hardly the point as it fails to convey the musicality of this master musician, unlike Post, Wanted Man, or Greatest Hits – Songs From The South, Vols. 1 & 2 does.

Adelaide is a great song and even though this collection is presented in alphabetical order, Adelaide is a fantastic opening song that sets the tone for the entire compilation. 

After The Show has a fantastic rhythm. I love it!

Anastasia Changes Her Mind isn’t fundamentally bad, but I have a love/hate relationship with semi-spoken word songs. That said, there are elements here, where Kelly begins to sing the lyrics, that are really enjoyable, but it isn’t enough to fully captivate me. 

Be Careful What You Pray For is a killer moody tune. 

Beautiful Promise is, pardon the pun, beautiful!

Before Too Long is one of Kelly’s most recognisable songs and is always sensational. 

Beggar On The Street Of Love is a great song, but I feel the mix isn’t quite right as Kelly’s vocal is just a little too forward for my liking. A shame, considering how much I genuinely love this song.

Behind The Bowler’s Arm is toe-tapping, head-bopping, gold. Magnificent!

Big Fine Girl has an incredible rhythm that will get your entire body moving. 

Blues For Skip is an incredible lo-fi tune, from a musical perspective, that allows Kelly’s vocal to shine.  

Bradman isn’t a bad homage to the legendary Australian cricketer. As a song, however, I have mixed feelings. It works, really well, but isn’t necessarily a song from Kelly’s catalog that I would seek out.

(The) Cake And The Candle is an incredible song and comes through with such transparency that you’d swear Kelly was in the same room as you. Music, especially live performances, that reach this sense of realism are difficult to find but are well worth it as your stereo system will never sound better.

Careless is an incredible song and this is one stunning performance. 

Change Your Mind is incredible!

Charlie Owen’s Slide Guitar is a solid tune, perhaps nothing to write home about, but enjoyable nevertheless.

Cities Of Texas is, for lack of a better term, a B-side. It works well in the flow of The A To Z Recordings, but as a song on its own, somewhat misses the mark. 

Coma is smooth, yet rough and ready. The contrast makes the song compelling and is a toe-tapper’s delight.  

Cradle Of Love is simply beautiful. 

Deeper Water is a good song, but I feel there are too many musical layers in this particular recording and, as such, my mind finds it difficult to connect with a specific rhythm. 

Desdemona is absolutely brilliant. I don’t know about you, dear reader, but I’d love to hear Neil Young cover this classic. 

Difficult Woman is magnificently moody. One of Kelly’s best without a doubt. 

Don’t Explain is fantastic. 

Don’t Harm The Messenger is a solid song and really comes into its own during the chorus and the final minute of the song. 

Don’t Stand So Close To The Window is a catchy tune that is thoroughly enjoyable.

Don’t Start Me Talking isn’t bad, but it isn’t a standout song either. 

Down To My Soul is utterly amazing and a hidden gem.

Dumb Things is one of my all-time favourite Paul Kelly songs. I first heard it when I saw the Yahoo Serious film Young Einstein and I haven’t forgotten it since. A great Aussie film with an exceptional soundtrack. This rendition retains everything that made the studio recording perfect and is beyond reproach.   

Emotional is simply stunning! 

Every F*****g City is average at best, but if this is a low in Kelly’s catalog, then he has absolutely nothing to worry about.

Everybody Wants To Touch Me is mediocre and it’s a shame because I’d enjoy the song more if the musicality was presented in a lower register. 

Everything’s Turning To White is another song in Kelly’s catalog that I’m not a fan of. It doesn’t mean it’s bad, of course, just that it doesn’t appeal to me and that I wouldn’t seek it out to listen to independently.

(The) Foggy Fields Of France is a fun little toe-tapping song. 

Foggy Highway is utterly brilliant with a great, but simple, rhythm that allows the music lover to immediately connect with the song. 

Forty Miles To Saturday Night is enjoyable but I feel the mix is a little out as I would have liked the instrumental elements to be boosted, perhaps by a decibel, as it almost sounds as though two different songs are struggling for the attention of the listener. 

Forty-Eight Angels has a compelling vocal delivery that I’ve always adored. Such a great tune!

From Little Things Big Things Grow is a song that everyone in Australia has heard, even if they didn’t know it was a Paul Kelly tune, for the song was used for a major marketing campaign for Industry Superfunds Australia (ISA). Subsequently, as much as I love this protest song, sometimes I am reminded of the advertisement; the aim of the marketing campaign of course, but I would much prefer to simply enjoy the song and reflect on the initial intent of the song. It’s interesting that Kelly gave ISA permission to use the song as I perceive no correlation. Nevertheless, if it brings about greater awareness, then one can suggest it isn’t a bad thing and even if you don’t listen to music for its literal interpretation, From Little Things Big Things Grow is one of the greatest songs ever written, by anyone, anywhere in the world. 

From St Kilda To Kings Cross is beautiful. 

Gathering Storm is short and sweet; so very sweet. I love it!

God Told Me To has an incredible twang but unlike Forty Miles To Saturday Night, I feel the instrumental element is a little too loud thereby taking away from Kelly’s incredible vocal delivery. 

(The) Gift That Keeps On Giving could have been the perfect title for this compilation. As a song on its own, (The) Gift That Keeps On Giving is an excellent composition and is thoroughly enjoyable.

Glory Be To God is sonically splendid. I could listen to Glory Be To God on repeat for an eternity. 

Going About My Father’s Business is yet another great song. There really isn’t a bad song in Kelly’s catalog, just ones that I connect with more than others.

How To Make Gravy is an excellent song that reminds me of Bob Dylan. Yes, there are many correlations between the two artists, but this is the one song that Kelly performs that instantly reminds me of Dylan. Not a bad thing, just an observation. 

I Can’t Believe We Were Married is a great tune.

I Close My Eyes And Think Of You is one of the most beautiful songs Kelly has ever penned and sung. No wonder he is a legend! 

I Don’t Know Anything Anymore is hypnotic. What’s not to like? I Don’t Know Anything Anymore Is one of the most relaxing songs you’ll ever listen to and my only complaint is that it is too short; although it’s perfect!

I Keep On Coming Back For More will get your body moving as the groove and vocal delivery is spectacular.

I’d Rather Go Blind is utterly brilliant and an absolute favourite of mine. 

If I Could Start Today Again is a lovely song that has flowed incredibly well, despite the alphabetical order, from the previous several songs proving just how consistently good Paul Kelly is as a songwriter and musician. 

I Wasted Time is solid, but isn’t anything to write home about. 

I Won’t Be Your Dog is stunning. You’ll want to turn up the volume and close your eyes while listening to this song. The slight echo in Kelly’s vocal really sets the song apart from the others on this compilation and while it is most likely unintentional and a result of the recording space, I find it adds a sense of depth that makes you sit up and take notice. 

Jandamarra/Pigeon is okay, but is ultimately a B-side from my perspective. 

Jump To Love is a great tune. Another one to play continuously on repeat? I think so!

Just About The Break is such a low, smooth, delicate song that it’s simply beautiful. 

King Of Fools is a solid song, but is nothing to write home about. 

Lately has a swing to it that could have easily come out of the 1930s or 1940s. It’s a great tune. 

Leaps And Bounds is a sonic wonderland. 

Little Boy, Don’t Lose Your Balls is a great song with a wit that is brilliant.

Love Is The Law is a little too campy for my liking. As with all other songs on this compilation, it isn’t bad, but if it were not part of this collection, I wouldn’t play it as a song on its own. 

Love Never Runs On Time has a killer harmonica and is overall a good tune. Nothing spectacular, but nothing offensive either. 

Luck is a solid tune. 

Maralinga (Rainy Land) is one of Kelly’s greatest songs. Sensational!

Meet Me In The Middle Of The Air is an a cappella song and is beautiful.

Midnight Rain has an incredible instrumental backing that enhances Kelly’s vocal perfectly.

My Way Is To You compels me to close my eyes as the musicality and Kelly’s vocal takes me on a sonic journey that has to be experienced to be fully understood. 

No You offers nothing to write home about, but isn’t fundamentally bad. No You just doesn’t stand out from the crowd, which is an issue in a compilation as broad as The A To Z Recordings.

Nothing But A Dream is an incredible song and that higher-pitched choral approach is so enjoyable and makes me think that this is a Paul Kelly song that would be perfect for Crowded House or Neil Finn, in particular, to cover. 

(The) Oldest Story In The Book has a catchy tune and chorus line that ensures it’s memorable. It’s another song that is amongst Kelly’s greatest. 

One More Tune is lovely. 

Other People’s Houses is a great song. Even though I’m not an overzealous fan of spoken word lyrics, Other People’s Houses is perfectly balanced and simply sounds right. I couldn’t imagine this song any other way and I’m glad it exists as it does. My only problem is that I can’t decide if I prefer this edition or the original studio release. Ultimately, it doesn’t matter as both are exceptional!

Our Sunshine has an old-west feel with a country twang. I love it!

Please Myself has a stellar vocal shift and distortion throughout. Add a simple rhythm and Please Myself most certainly pleases this fan. 

Pretty Place is a solid tune, but ultimately a B-side. 

(The Ballad Of) Queenie And Rover is, as Pretty Place is, a B-side for this listener. 

Rally Round The Drum is a great, meat and potatoes, tune. Sometimes that is all you need. 

Randwick Bells is a solid track, but nothing to write home about. I don’t know about you, dear reader, but I have a love/hate relationship with semi-spoken songs. I find them compelling but then at the same time, I’d much prefer to have a little more rhythm to toe-tap and head-bop to as well as sing along to. That said, the closing minute largely negates this thought.

Saturday Night And Sunday Morning is a great tune. It’s time to get that acoustic air guitar out, for I adore that guitar strumming and the tuning of the instrument on this track.  

Shane Warne is largely unforgettable but is a rather cool and humorous homage to the Australian cricketer. 

Smoke Under The Bridge is a lovely, hypnotic, tune. It is, as many of Kelly’s songs are, incredibly relaxing. 

Somebody’s Forgetting Somebody is a solid song, but not a standout. Although, that harmonica is a pure pleasure to listen to. 

Somewhere In The City is magnificent!

South Of Germany as a vocal-only song is spectacular and showcases just how incredible Kelly’s vocal prowess is and how much control he has over it. 

Standing On The Street Of Early Sorrows is a song that I wouldn’t necessarily gravitate towards when thinking of Paul Kelly, but I’d be lying if I said that I didn’t thoroughly enjoy it every time I hear it as the vocal delivery and backing is glorious. 

Stolen Apples is a great tune and while Crowded House write their own songs, I’d love to hear them cover this one.  

Stories Of Me is an incredible, multi-layered, acoustic tune.

Stupid Song is anything but stupid. I love it! 

Summer Rain is average at best. Yes, it works well within the compilation but as a song on its own, I just don’t find it compelling. 

Sweet Guy is incredible and Kelly’s vocal delivery is the definition of perfection.  

Sydney From A 747 isn’t bad, but it isn’t anything to write home about. Although, the intermingling guitars make this one enjoyable song. 

They Thought I Was Asleep is an incredible story-based song. 

Thoughts In The Middle Of The Night is stunning. The music will envelop you and Kelly is most certainly in the room with you when you listen to this track. An exceptional song and a stunning recording. 

To Her Door is a well-known masterpiece. One of Kelly’s most recognisable recordings and arguably one of his very best. 

Until Death Do Them Part isn’t bad, but it isn’t great. It simply exists and sometimes that is good enough. I wouldn’t, however, hold up Until Death Do Them Part as a defining moment in Kelly’s recording career. 

When I First Met Your Ma is thoroughly enjoyable from start to finish and is, in my opinion, a hidden gem. I love it!

Winter Coat is a great tune. I adore Kelly’s vocal on this recording and his control over his vocal is most certainly impressive. 

Won’t You Come Around? has a great rhythm that will get your body moving and once again that harmonica steals the stage. 

Would You Be My Friend? is astonishingly good and sounds as though Kelly is singing to you, in a private concert. Sensational!

You Broke A Beautiful Thing is, pun intended, a beautiful thing! 

You Can Put Your Shoes Under My Bed isn’t a bad song, but it isn’t anything to write home about either. 

You Can’t Take It With You is such a good song with a sensational rhythm and a fantastic lyrical meaning. 

Your Little Sister Is A Big Girl Now has a killer intermingling guitar track; such an enjoyable song! 

Young Lovers is one of Kelly’s most beautiful songs. It isn’t necessarily the story he tells via the song, but it is the way he performs it that makes Young Lovers one very special song indeed.

You’re 39, You’re Beautiful And You’re Mine is a lovely tune. 

Your Loving Is On My Mind has always been one of my favourite Paul Kelly tracks and leaves me somewhat speechless; it is that good! 

Zoe is a solid song and while it may have taken over 6 hours to get to this stage, if you’re like me, you’re likely going to go back to Adelaide and listen to this masterpiece again. 

Whether you’re going on a road trip, going about your daily routine, or sitting intently absorbing every element of Kelly’s performances, you’re bound to adore this collection of songs for it is some of the finest singer-songwriter music you’re ever likely to hear, anywhere, by anyone.  

If you’d be more content with an abridged version, a Best Of The A To Z Recordings (2LP vinyl release) is available. 

A Deluxe Edition including Kelly’s memoir, How To Make Gravy, is also available as well as the standard 8-CD release, and a digital release on iTunes

If you’re remotely interested in Paul Kelly, then this compilation is a must-own. While it isn’t as concise as Greatest Hits – Songs From The South, Vols. 1 & 2, it will give you hours of bliss and a deeper view into the wonder that is Paul Kelly.  

Comment

Slipknot – We Are Not Your Kind (Album Review)

Comment

Slipknot – We Are Not Your Kind (Album Review)

When I saw Slipknot perform Unsainted, on Jimmy Kimmel Live, I have to admit that I wasn’t impressed. I didn’t connect with the song as I hoped I would and Taylor’s new mask made me question the direction Slipknot was taking. Thankfully, I don’t have to look at #8 when listening to We Are Not Your Kind and therefore Unsainted and the entire album is simply stunning.

Yes, that mask. It’s the worst in Slipknot history, making me think of Meat Loaf and what he’d look like if his face melted from too much cosmetic surgery. It shouldn’t taint the music, but unfortunately, it does when you see them perform live. It will be interesting to see if Taylor keeps dawning the same mask on tour, or if he makes minor adjustments to it as I don’t think it will appeal to many fans; what do you think about the mask, dear reader? 

After two decades since their eponymous debut, Slipknot has largely become part of the social consciousness and it is difficult for me to recall a time when the band weren’t part of the music scene. Perhaps I’m just getting old, but it is amazing to think We Are Not Your Kind is only their sixth studio release as it feels as though they’ve been around forever. Nevertheless, I’m thoroughly enjoying this release and can say without a doubt that it is amongst their very best work and is one of the greatest albums of 2019. 

Insert Coin is a killer tune to introduce the album and flows magically into Unsainted. I don’t know about you, but I couldn’t have asked for a better, slow-burn, introduction. I love it!

Unsainted is EPIC! The choral introduction merged with the musicality and Taylor’s vocal is something very special indeed as it builds up to the tempo we’re used to hearing from Slipknot, then downshifts as the chorus kicks in. Brilliant! 

I hope you’ve already pumped that volume to 11, for this is not one album you want to play at low levels. The Apple Music stream sounds excellent, but I dare say the vinyl release would trump it. That is certainly the version I hope to pick up, sooner rather than later. 

Birth Of The Cruel has a seriously good rhythm and Taylor’s firing lyrical delivery is right on par with what we’ve come to expect from Slipknot over the years. Taylor is a vocal maestro and while I could listen to Slipknot’s musicality for countless hours, it is Taylor that makes it worthwhile for me and it shows in Birth Of The Cruel. This will be one killer song for them to perform live. 

Dead Because Of Death is an interesting interlude that refreshes the pallet in preparation for Nero Forte. I thoroughly enjoy it, but I can’t help but wonder what an expansion of this song would have sounded like. Nevertheless, I love it!

Nero Forte has a killer guitar riff and rhythm that is Slipknot 101 with a vocal growl that only Taylor can deliver with absolute precision. Nero Forte is going to be mosh pit gold. 

Critical Darling, as with many of the songs on We Are Not Your Kind, has an incredible introduction that draws you in from the very first note. Critical Darling is a great tune, but the chorus is a little weak, from a musical perspective, in my opinion. In many ways, when I listen to Critical Darling, it sounds as though it would have fit perfectly on All Hope Is Gone. That isn’t a criticism for I adore their 2008 release, but just a noticeable correlation. The final minute is also intriguing as it sounds like it’s the start of a new song, or another interlude, but it isn’t. I’d love to know what the thought process was with regards to the outro on Critical Darling. That said, it does flow beautifully into A Liar’s Funeral.

A Liar’s Funeral is incredible! The slow and bright tempo, mixed with the demonic, is a perfect mix and Taylor absolutely nails the vocal in both styles. Without a doubt, A Liar’s Funeral is one of the best songs on the album and one of the best in Slipknot’s extensive catalogue. While I’m not sure if A Liar’s Funeral has the potential to be a fan favourite, when played live, I adore the studio recording. 

Red Flag is old school Slipknot! What’s not to like?

What’s Next has a terrible xylophone-styled interlude that admittedly introduces Spiders well, but is largely superfluous to the album, other than being an indicator of shifting gears. 

Spiders is a great song with a great rhythm but I’m not convinced by the Horror-movie styled backing. It works, but I can’t help but think that after repeat listens that I may grow tired of it. I guess we’ll just have to wait and see. Nevertheless, Spiders is thoroughly enjoyable but a remix wouldn’t go astray. 

Orphan is a great song, but it takes a little too long to get into the core of the song in my opinion. I also wish the chorus was more pronounced as it is incredible. I could, honestly, listen to the chorus of Orphan on repeat indefinitely. 

My Pain is, interesting! Even after multiple listens, I’m not sure it fits the album too well. That said, as a song on its own, the layers of musicality are intense and the soundstage will compel and envelop you. My Pain is a song that you’re going to have to listen to multiple times to really connect with it. That isn’t necessarily a bad thing because it allows for greater appreciation of the song and album, but I’d love to know what the thought process was in the studio when it came to not only recording My Pain but including it on We Are Not Your Kind.

Not Long For This World is a stellar track. The slow-burn intro once again compels me and the rhythmic undertone ticks all the boxes. However, as much as I enjoy it, it needs a little less treble and a little more bass. It doesn’t sound flat and from the sounds of it, the style is intentional, but I really do like Slipknot’s music when the rhythm reaches into your soul and takes you on a visceral journey where you feel the music rather than hear it. Not Long For This World just misses the mark when it comes to the complete sensory experience that I associate with Slipknot; yet the outro gets the low end pumping as it merges into Solway Firth. 

Solway Firth is a killer closing track that will compel you to listen to the album again and stay within Slipknot’s catalogue. 

Overall, We Are Not Your Kind is an incredible release. As an album, it is a cohesive experience that you would be advised to sit and listen to from start to finish. I’d also say that We Are Not Your Kind is one of Slipknot’s most accessible albums as it will appeal to hardcore fans and newcomers alike. Slipknot, like a good bottle of wine, gets better and better; the future looks good for us maggots!

We Are Not Your Kind is available on Vinyl, CD, and the iTunes Store.  

Click here to read other Slipknot reviews by Subjective Sounds.

Comment

Cosmonauts – A-Ok! (Album Review)

Comment

Cosmonauts – A-Ok! (Album Review)

Have you ever had that moment when you look at your record collection, be it digital or physical, and can not recall why an album exists or a single song from it? 

Well, I have, and A-Ok! is one album that falls under that category. 

In order to write this review, I had to re-listen to the album. I had initially only decided to listen once because if I could find no compelling reason to pen a review, or keep it in my Apple Music library, then I was determined to delete it. Nevertheless, after the first playthrough, I found myself captivated and played it several more times. 

While the Cosmonauts are garage punk at their core, A-Ok! is different. Yes, there are punk elements, but much of the album has a smooth overture that is soothing and allows your mind to drift away. If anything, perhaps it would be correct to class A-Ok! as pop-punk. Regardless, music doesn’t always have to be assigned a specific genre, so join me as I take a look at the album and explain the reasons why A-Ok! will be remaining in my Apple Music library.

A-Ok! opens the album with plenty of energy and you may understand from the get-go why I class A-Ok! as pop-punk. It’s a great song and offers an interesting contrast as the vocal presentation is very much punk-inspired while the musicality is arguably pop-driven. That said, it works, really well! 

Doom Generation has a killer introduction. In some respects, I would have loved to have heard Doom Generation open the album, but it flows perfectly from A-Ok! Doom Generation reminds me somewhat of Babylon Zoo; a compliment as Doom Generation is thoroughly enjoyable and gets me moving to the rhythm.

Party At Sunday is the first mellow tune on the album and I absolutely adore it. Sit, turn the volume up, and close your eyes, you won’t regret it as the soundstage will envelop you and hold you there until the very last note.

Be-Bop-A-Loser picks up the tempo significantly from Party At Sunday, but at no time do you feel a jolt to the senses. Be-Bop-A-Loser isn’t overall a bad song, it’s most certainly on the punk side of the album, but it doesn’t necessarily offer anything to write home about. A B-side? Perhaps, but it is A-Side worthy, just not a standout!

Short Wave Communication, however, is a B-Side and a sonic mess.  

Heavenspeak is a killer song with an incredible rhythmic presentation; the total opposite of Short Wave Communication. 

Good Lucky Blessing is a song that reminds me of U2 and David Bowie. Yes, I know, sometimes my music correlations can be a little left-of-the-centre, but I do love how within a song, or album, I can hear a similarity even if it is completely unintended by the artist. When this happens, I often find myself heading across and listening to the other artist’s catalogue which makes exploring music an incredible experience. All that aside, Good Lucky Blessing is a solid track that works well within the context of the album.

Cruisin’ is a solid song, but you really have to lock in to that backbeat if you’re going to enjoy it as the chorus and overlapping vocals can be a little distracting, thereby temporarily removing you from the experience that is Cruisin’. 

Discophilia is probably my favourite song on the album. It is a mellow, guitar-riffing, wonderland with a perfect lyrical presentation and drum track. I could listen to it on repeat indefinitely. 

Graffiti is a solid song to close the album on with a killer fade-out that compels me to listen to the album again and explore more of the Cosmonauts growing catalogue of music. 

Overall, A-Ok! Is a thoroughly enjoyable album from start to finish and while I will most certainly be keeping it in my digital library, I don’t feel the need to own a copy physically. That isn’t a reflection on the album but more a realisation that I need to cull my physical library a little and ensure that I don’t get every album my heart desires; it can be quite an expensive hobby, can’t it? Plus, the Apple Music edition of the album sounds superb and therefore from a sonic perspective, I’m not looking for anything more. Of course, you never know, I have been known to be fickle and A-Ok! is most certainly good enough that if I came across it while crate digging, I’d likely pick it up. 

A-Ok! is available on bandcamp, Burger Records (Vinyl), and the iTunes Store

Comment

Ozzy Osbourne – Under Cover (Album Review)

Comment

Ozzy Osbourne – Under Cover (Album Review)

Ozzy Osbourne is a living legend and while is work in Black Sabbath and his solo career has been spectacular, was a covers album really what fans were looking for from his ninth studio album? The song selection, focusing on rock and roll from the 60s and 70s, is fantastic and it’s unlikely you’ll hear a song that you’ve never heard before. Of course, the biggest question is if these songs suit Osbourne’s vocal and musical styles or is Under Cover largely a self-indulgent release and homage to Osbourne’s musical idols?

Rocky Mountain Way is a Joe Walsh classic and Osbourne performs it admirably, mixing a little of his own style while paying homage to the original. If you like Joe Walsh’s recording of this song but want it to feature a little more hard rock, perhaps a touch of metal, then you’re going to love this cover.

In My Life (Radio Edit) is a beautiful song and was one of the best songs from The Beatles’ Rubber Soul; although there are so many! One of the things I’ve always found fascinating about Osbourne is that despite his hard rocker persona, he can sing ballads exceptionally well and I’d even argue that he is a better ballad singer than he is a heavy metal vocalist. That may irritate some, but I’m blown away with his performance of In My Life. It is so good that as much as I adore The Beatles original, I enjoy Osbourne’s better; partially due to the darker style and the slower tempo. Regardless, both are exceptional and Osbourne has done himself proud on In My Life.  

Mississippi Queen is a killer rock and roll tune that is styled very similarly to the original Mountain classic. Do I have a preferred version? Not really, they’re both exceptional but if you’re looking for a little more hard rock, then Osbourne’s rendition is the one to listen to. 

Go Now is one song that I would have never imagined Osbourne covering. It’s a great song and while you may be familiar with The Moody Blues version, the Bessie Banks original is the one to beat and Osbourne has done just that. An exceptional cover with a gorgeous musical interlude that includes a piano and guitar solo. I love it!

Woman is one of the greatest songs ever written and recorded. It doesn’t matter how good this rendition is, nothing and nobody will ever beat John Lennon’s original. That said, Osbourne covers it superbly, paying homage to the original while also putting his own spin on this classic.

21 Century Schizoid Man is a classic late 60s masterpiece that Osbourne has turned up to 11. 

All The Young Dudes is a killer tune. A David Bowie original composition, Bowie’s recording has always been exceptional, as was the original recording of the song by Mott the Hoople, but Osbourne takes All The Young Dudes to another level completely. Sensational!

For What It’s Worth is an incredible cover. I love the Buffalo Springfield original and it is that version that we’re arguably most familiar with. However, if you’re looking for a modern interpretation that infuses the original with hard rock elements, then look no further for this is utterly perfect.  

Good Times is a song I’ve never been fond of. The Animals original isn’t fundamentally bad, but it never grabbed my attention. While there is nothing wrong with Osbourne’s interpretation, it doesn’t change my thoughts on the song as a whole.

Sunshine Of Your Love is one of the greatest songs from the 60s. The distortion in the original Cream version is stunningly good and while you can’t beat the original, Osbourne pays homage to it and adds a little of a harder rock edge to the song that I find to be thoroughly enjoyable. A killer song no matter who performs it!

Fire is a really interesting psychedelic rock tune from 1968. The Arthur Brown original isn’t bad, but Osbourne has made Fire his own and I much prefer this interpretation. 

Working Class Hero is another John Lennon classic. Again, Osbourne doesn’t disappoint. Admittedly, he doesn’t stray too far from the original in his interpretation, but Osbourne’s approach breathes new life into Working Class Hero and is arguably perfectly suited to his vocal and musical style. 

Sympathy For The Devil is a killer song. The Rolling Stones are the ultimate masters and arguably nobody has done it better. Yes, Guns N’ Roses covered it incredibly well, but the original is beyond reproach. Nevertheless, Osbourne’s rendition is enjoyable and is a great closer for this collection of covers ensuring that I’ll likely listen to the album again, stay within Osbourne’s catalogue, or explore the original artists he’s covered. Yes, on some editions of the album, the Black Sabbath song, Changes (with Kelly Osbourne), is included but that isn’t the case with the Apple Music release which sticks to the original 13-track lineup. 

As far as cover albums go, this is one of the most enjoyable I’ve come across. Yes, I would have preferred to have more original Osbourne music, but he has given fans a look at some of his favourite tunes and has covered them with the respect they deserve. Under Cover, however, isn’t an album I go to when I think of Osbourne, but I’d be lying if I said that I didn’t thoroughly enjoy it when listening to his entire catalogue. 

Under Cover is available on CD and iTunes.

Comment

Ash Grunwald – Live At The Fly By Night (Live Album Review)

Comment

Ash Grunwald – Live At The Fly By Night (Live Album Review)

As I listen to Live At The Fly By Night, I find myself captivated by the non-stop groove of Grunwald. This man certainly has bucket loads of rhythm to go along with what Ian McFarlane rightly claimed as a guttural resonant vocal styled somewhat after Tom Waits, Howling Wolf, Elmore James, and Robert Johnson. I couldn’t have described Grunwald’s musicality better myself and if you haven’t got a copy, you’ll find a wealth of information in McFarlane’s opus The Encyclopedia of Australian Rock And Pop.

Normally when I think of live albums, I have mixed emotions. Many are excellent, others are average at best. It really is a mixed bag. However, Live At The Fly By Night is one of the best live recordings I’ve ever heard. The mix, the dynamics, and the correct levelling of audience interaction make for a compelling listen that I’m certain you’ll love. While I can’t say for certain that some studio mastery hasn’t been applied here, I don’t care because the mastering is utterly perfect and showcases just how good music can sound if recorded, mixed, and mastered with care. 

Sadly, this release has never been issued on vinyl, but to be completely honest, the Apple Music stream, which this review is based on, is stunning with an incredible soundstage and tonality that gets you as close to vinyl as digital ever will. I can only imagine how good the CD sounds but I can assure you that you’re not missing a thing if you choose to listen to Live At The Fly By Night via Apple Music.

Intro helps to set the tone of the performance and while I’m not overly enthralled by the audience inclusion here, there is little doubt that the mix is perfect. The musical elements, and overall soundstage, really put you in a prime position to thoroughly enjoy the performance. If that rhythm doesn’t get you going, I don’t know what will. It is stunningly hypnotic and flows masterfully into Can You Find A Way.

Can You Find A Way is toe-tapping and head-bopping gold, with a guitar riff that will make you want to pick up the instrument. The distorted vocal is equally compelling and while other artists are unable to pull it off, Grunwald delivers it in a non-offensive manner that ensures it enhances the song and overall musicality. 

Skywriter is a great tune. The upbeat tempo and distorted guitar is simply stunning. I don’t know about you, dear reader, but I love singing along to the chorus of Skywriter and playing my air guitar during that killer solo. 

Mojo is one of Grunwald’s best. Turn that volume up to 11; you can thank me later! 

Rosie has a brilliant vocal mix and flows perfectly in the live lineup. 

Fish Out Of Water is a moody track with a killer rhythm. I love it!

The Devil Called Me A Liar has a killer introduction but I find the song loses a little of its magic as it progresses. It isn’t bad, but if there is a B-side to be heard on Live At The Fly By Night, then The Devil Called Me A Liar is most certainly it.

1976 Coaster Van reminds me fondly of Chris Isaak’s Baby Did A Bad Bad Thing from Forever Blue; especially in the intro. 1976 Coaster Van is a solid track but I feel the spoken word element in the middle of the song detracts from the experience and the tempo speed-up makes it near impossible for the listener to stay locked into the groove. 

Just Be Yourself starts with a magical guitar introduction and continues with a fat bass track that is as relaxing as it is compelling. It doesn’t matter how still I try to make myself, the rhythm gets into your bones and your body will move even if you’re intent not to. Also, the tempo increase here, unlike 1976 Coaster Van, is perfect, ensuring that I don’t lose track of the rhythm. Returning to the slower tempo towards the end of the song is equally smooth and Just Be Yourself is arguably one of my favourite songs from the album; yes, even with the audience singing along towards the end. Again, the mix is spot on.

Money / Breakout has a magical intro. The killer rhythm will get you as will the lyrical style that is easy to sing along to. Money / Breakout is, without a doubt, an audible experience that you have to hear to believe. A stunning merging of two songs and this is without a doubt one of Grunwald’s greatest live performances and is arguably a fan favourite whenever played live. My only criticism is the slowing tempo at the end as it feels unnecessary.

Give Signs / Serious as the final track on Live At The Fly By Night certainly compels me to listen to the album again and stay within Grunwald’s growing catalogue of music. Sensational!

From start to finish, Live At The Fly By Night is nothing short of pure perfection. There isn’t a dull moment and as far as live releases go, this is up there with the very best that I’ve heard and as happy as I am with the Apple Music stream, I really want a vinyl release to add to the collection because that cover art deserves to be seen and held on the larger canvas. I love it!

Live At The Fly By Night is available on CD and iTunes.

Comment